Manolo Blahník, Candy-Colored Shoes for Sofia Coppola’s movie Marie Antoinette

11 Sep
2a0334dd7f023e00d8b4ef97bd1686d3Kirsten Dunst as Marie Antoinette
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Blahník empathizes with Marie Antoinette. “When I was a little boy, my mother used to read to me and my sister pages of Marie Antoinette’s biography. I was very much aware of the unjust way that woman was treated by the lovely French people,” says the Spanish designer, the reigning king of sexy shoes. “I for one, I find her so inspiring. She died so badly, to pay for her sins. Yes she spent money that she shouldn’t, but she was young and bored.”Manolo Blaníck shoes for movie Marie Antoinette

Manolo Blaníck shoes for movie Marie Antoinette

Manolo Blaníck shoes for movie Marie Antoinette

Spending money they shouldn’t describes many of Blahník’s customers, though “should” and “shouldn’t” is up for debate. It was Madonna, after all, who described his footwear as “better than sex.”

I’m going to have this inscribed on my tombstone,” he says of the famous quote. But any woman who’s slipped on one of his slender stilettos and witnessed the magic it wreaks with her leg – cankles, be gone! – knows that it is absolutely true. So when Sofia Coppola needed a designer to recreate the period’s decadent shoes that were handed to the spoiled queen (Kirsten Dunst) on a posh pillow, she called on Blahník. Her film, “Marie Antoinette” is partly based on an Antonia Fraser biography of the queen that takes a particularly sympathetic tack, much like Manolo’s, on the subject. Movie buff Blahník started his homework by studying original 18th-century shoes in Paris. The Victoria and Albert museum in London gave him footwear that belonged to the French queen. “So I did some kind of a cross between academic and a little bit of fantasy,” he says. But then, his shoes – especially the film’s, a collection of candy-colored heels embellished with ribbon and buttons and beads – are a fantasy. “Indeed, that is the only thing I want to offer to people,” he says. “Of course, I’m like everybody else; I have to do black and brown shoes and a little bit of Mary Janes and satin, but my nature is kind of theatrical, simple and dramatic.”

Manolo Blaníck shoes for movie Marie Antoinette

Manolo Blaníck shoes for movie Marie Antoinette

Manolo Blaníck shoes for movie Marie Antoinette

Born in the Canary Islands, Blahník, now 73, studied literature before turning his attention to fashion. Today, he still handcrafts hundreds of shoes every year, starting with a careful sketch (“I drive everybody mad with my constant sketching,” he says), then following the process through, stitch by stitch. He didn’t even get the chance to bask in the glamour of moviemaking. Instead of on-set visits to “Antoinette” with Coppola, Dunst and Oscar-winning costume designer Milena Canonero, Blahník was hard at work back home. “My assistant was going to Paris, to try the things, but I’m a factory boy. I work in the factory. But yes, it was an incredibly tight collaboration between everybody in the film.”

Though he’s the most recognizable name in shoes, he was shocked at the play his confections received in the film. “I didn’t expect it,” he said. “I thought, under those big dresses you would see a glimpse, but the camera lingers for a moment on the shoes, and the ladies of the court are looking at the shoes, and it’s quite extraordinary how they captured it. I’m very, very pleased actually; it was a challenge for me, but I was very surprised.”

Manolo Blaníck shoes for movie Marie Antoinette

Manolo Blaníck shoes for movie Marie Antoinette

Manolo Blaníck shoes for movie Marie Antoinette

The fancy footwear’s gotten such a great reaction, he’s even been approached to make more Hollywood hoofs. “I have many other offers from this movie,” he says. “But I’m doing shoes for the time being.”

And in between the sketching and sewing, he’s traveling the country, signing thousands of shoes for hours and hours during personal appearances at Neiman Marcus stores. But after more than four decades, Blahník never tires of his chosen craft. “Sometimes I do these nonsense shoes, and sometimes I do incredible things that I like even now, after many years. If I do this job, it’s because I have a passion for legs, women’s legs, and that is why I still do it. Every day I just think about something and I go back to the drawing board.”

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Manolo Blahník and Sophia Coppola in Conversation

Manolo Blahník: You may not know this, but I have been obsessed with Marie Antoinette ever since I was a child. My mother, also a fan, used to read Stefan Zweig’s biography to me and my sister at bedtime, over and over again, though she always stopped with the storming of the Bastille. What attracted you to the story? Was it Lady Antonia Fraser’s book?

Sofia Coppola: Oh, I always loved the idea of her and that period and the decadence and isolation from reality… and I loved Antonia’s book because she looked at her story from her point of view and was sympathetic in understanding what it must have been like for her. I think it’s easy to make her stupid, or a villain, and I liked taking her side. I was living in Los Angeles when I was working on the script and saw a lot of women, bored trophy wives, buying shoes to cheer themselves up. And I could imagine what it must have been like for her.

Sofia CoppolaSofia Coppola
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Manolo Blahník: I adore how you made it modern and relevant to today. It was very clever of you not to make another costume drama.

Sofia Coppola: Oh, thank you. I was really trying to do the opposite of Masterpiece Theatre, and not worry about being perfectly accurate, but more to capture the feeling of what it was like and make the audience feel like they are with them, not looking back at some other time. I wanted the dresses to feel new and lavish, not off a dusty shelf in a museum. And I thought that if she was alive, she would ask you to make her shoes.

Manolo Blahník: Thank you. I’m flattered! And how wonderful that you had access to Versailles, and to be able to shoot where events actually happened.

Sofia Coppola: Yes, it was a privilege to be able to shoot there, and it made it all so much better for us, even on an emotional level.

Manolo Blahník: Your film was actually a kind of culmination of my love for Marie Antoinette. I had pictured it in my head ever since I was young, and there it was on-screen, captured so beautifully, with so much attention to the tiniest detail. Every frame is picture-perfect. How important was it for you to tell the story aesthetically?

Sofia Coppola: Oh, I loved getting into the beauty of her world, which seems to make up so much of their day-to-day life —the rituals and decorating themselves and their spaces. I loved that they changed the curtains with the seasons.

Manolo Blahník: Your casting was genial! Marianne Faithfull as Maria Theresa of Austria; Judy Davis, marvelous as the Comtesse de Noailles; Rip Torn as Louis XV; your cousin Jason Schwartzman; and all those wonderful girls – Natasha Fraser Cavassoni, Victoire de Castellane, Camille Miceli in small cameos.

Sofia Coppola: Thanks, that was really fun to see them in that world and imagine them as real people. I love casting and worked with Fred Roos on this. I loved Judy Davis from Woody Allen’s film Husbands and Wives. I was happy to have Marianne! It was fun to do it in a little bit of a pop way, but I always tried to make them real.

Manolo BlahnickManolo Blahníck
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Manolo Blahník: I was beyond excited when I received the call from Milena Canonero – whom I consider to be one of the most important costume designers in film history – asking me to make the shoes for the film. Tell me about working with her.

Sofia Coppola: She’s incredible. I have so much admiration for her and how she works; her attention to detail is so impressive. She cares about a hem that’s miles away and really is involved in every detail and the hair and makeup.

Manolo Blahník: During one of the conversations I had with her, she said to me, “Don’t be academic. Think of Marie Antoinette as a modern woman.”

Sofia Coppola: Oh, that’s great. Milena’s so cool; she really got what I wanted to do and helped create her world. And even though her work is exquisite, she’s not precious about it. I always loved Marisa Berenson in that fur hood in Barry Lyndon that Milena did.

Manolo Blahník: I adore Marisa in Barry Lyndon. In fact, I adore everything about that film. It’s so chic! Did you watch any other Marie Antoinette’s in your research? I’m mad for Norma Shearer in W. S. Van Dyke’s 1938 version. It’s unbelievably outrageous, with those costumes by Adrian, Tyrone Power as Fersen, and the most wonderful chandeliers, which I later saw at Debbie Reynolds’s museum in Las Vegas. And Michèle Morgan in Jean Delannoy’s film [1955]. Kirsten Dunst was perfect casting, though; she was exquisite.

Sofia Coppola: Oh, yes, I love the Hollywood version! I wanted to make something as over the top, but that felt real, and show her as a young girl.

Manolo Blahník: I always find the scene when the young Antoinette is handed over to the French on the island near Kehl incredibly poignant. The poor girl, stripped of everything Austrian, to be replaced by French clothing, and to suddenly find herself having to adhere to the rigors of court etiquette. You captured that so beautifully.

Sofia Coppola: Oh, thanks. I couldn’t believe they really did that – took her dog and her underwear. I loved what Antonia wrote about those important details; they said so much to me about her situation.

 Watch the full movie:   https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GoYozK0WasY

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Book

Book cover

Manolo Blahník: Fleeting Gestures and Obsessions

The first comprehensive and lavishly illustrated volume to document the influences and life work of Manolo Blahník, one of the most influential and talked-about icons in contemporary fashion. Featuring more than forty years of shoe design, this is the definitive monograph of the work of Manolo Blahník, one of the titans of contemporary fashion.

Manolo Blahnik: Fleeting Gestures and Obsessions

This book is a comprehensive survey of Blahník’s work and provides access to never-before-seen photography of designs. Drawing inspiration from the worlds of architecture, art, film, and literature, Blahnik is a master of the art of the shoe. His exciting use of color, unprecedented designs, and exquisitely sculpted heels make his shoes some of the most coveted in the world. Featuring more than 250 iconic designs from his archive, the book reveals for the very first time the inspirations behind his singular artistic vision.

Manolo Blahnik: Fleeting Gestures and ObsessionsWith insightful chapters devoted to Blahník’s most powerful relationships and inspirations—including Marie Antoinette, Diana Vreeland, Cecil Beaton, Spanish and Italian film, the works of Goya and Velázquez and the Prado Museum—this book is a personal look into the man behind the shoes. Beautiful photography and thoughtful essays by fashion writers, curators, and colleagues give readers a unique opportunity to access Blahník’s vivid and creative-filled world..

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manolo blahnikManolo Blahník
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info:

http://www.nydailynews.com

http://www.sothebys.com/en/news-video/blogs/all-blogs/sotheby-s-at-large/2015/12/manolo-blahnik-and-sofia-coppola.html

http://www.rizzoliusa.com/book.php?isbn=9780847846184

Serge Lutens, a Visionaire in Many Ways

28 Aug
Serge Lutens & modelSerge Lutens & model
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Serge Lutens (born 14 March 1942, in Lille, France) is a French make-up artist,  photographer, filmmaker, hair stylist, perfume art-director and fashion designer.

Serge Lutens

Short Biography

Serge Lutens was born during the war, on March 14th, 1942 in Lille, in northern France.

Separated from his mother when he was just weeks old, his personality was indelibly marked by this original abandonment. Permanently torn between two families, he lived life at a distance and through his imagination. He was a dreamer. At the École Montesquieu, they said he was “on the moon”: he paid no attention, although his teachers recognised that he was a gifted storyteller.

In 1956, at the age of 14, he was given a job against his will – he would have preferred being an actor – in a beauty salon in his native city.

Two years later, he had already established the feminine hallmarks that he would make his own: eye shadow , ethereally beautiful skin, short hair plastered down. He also became known for the colour black, from which he never deviated. He confirmed his tastes and his choices with the female friends of his whom he photographed.

serge-lutens-in-1972-age-30Serge Lutens at work, 1973
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He was 18 when he was called up to serve in the army during the Algerian War. He was remoulded. This was an important break that led him to make his decision: to leave Lille and head for Paris. This was 1962.

Helped by a friend, Madeleine Levy, and bearing large prints of his photographs of his friends, Serge Lutens, experiencing his first years in Paris at a time of insecurity and want, contacted Vogue magazine. For him, this magazine represented the essence of beauty: a sort of convent that he mythologised. Three days later, he collaborated on the Christmas issue.

Serge Lutens for Vogue

Makeup artist Serge Lutens’ 1973 beauty shoot for Vogue. Each image is inspired by various renowned French Artists throughout history. This particular image pays homage to Fernand Léger’s 1922 painting, “La Femme et L’enfant”

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The creator of a vision through makeup, jewellery and extraordinary objets, Serge Lutens quickly became the person to call, and the fashion magazines were not mistaken: Elle, Jardin des Modes, Harper’s Bazaar were constantly after him: he worked with the greatest photographers of the time, all the while pursuing his own photographic work. During these years, his talent was fully acknowledged.

In 1967, Christian Dior, who was preparing to launch its makeup line, called upon him. For the House of Dior he would create colours, style and images. Finally, his vision was unified through photography.

Serge Lutens for DiorSerge Lutens for Dior 1975

Serge Lutens for Dior

Serge Lutens for Dior

Dior, 1973 Photo by Serge Lutens

Serge Lutens for Dior

In the early 1970’s, the famous editor-in-chief of US Vogue, Diana Vreeland, was unstinting in her enthusiasm: “Serge Lutens, Revolution of Make-up!” His success was resounding. Serge Lutens became the symbol of the freedom created through makeup, for a whole new generation.

In 1974, mirroring his taste for films and the legendary actresses in them, he made a short: “Les Stars.”

During this period, he travelled widely, exploring Morocco and later Japan. These two countries, with their rich and yet so different cultures, came together in him and confirmed his way of seeing and feeling.

le-monde-photo-serge-lutens-1971Serge Lutens & geisha, ph. for Le Monde, 1971
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He recalled them some years later, in 1980, when he signed on with Shiseido for a collaboration that was to enable the Japanese cosmetics group, until then unknown on the international scene, to establish such a powerful visual identity that it became one of the world’s leading market players in the 1980’s and ‘90’s.

In 1982, for the same brand, he conceived Nombre Noir, his first perfume, dressed in lustrous black on matte black, a concept that foreshadowed the ubiquitous codes of the 1990’s. While his first perfume marked the 1980’s, it was through his creation of Féminité du Bois and Les Salons du Palais Royal in 1992 with their dreamlike décor, that Serge Lutens led his first true olfactory revolution in the field of perfume.

Fragrances like Ambre sultan, Tubéreuse criminelle, Cuir mauresque… have since become indispensable, writing a new page in the History of Fragrances.Shiseido

The logical culmination of this came in 2000 when Serge Lutens created the brand that today bears his name and establishes his uncompromising style. Perfumes and makeup (“Nécessaire de beauté”), his expressions in this area, are marketed through specialised and selective distribution and more confidentially at the Palais Royal-Serge Lutens.

His innovations in this field have received many prestigious awards, including several FIFI awards from the Fragrance Foundation.

Serge Lutens

In 2004, at the invitation of “Lille, European Capital of Culture,” he designed an olfactory labyrinth around scents from his childhood: this installation met with great intergenerational success.

In 2007 Serge Lutens was awarded the distinction of Commander in the Order of Arts and Letters.

Starting in 2010, Serge Lutens established a connection between perfumes and literature and opened up a new path with what he calls an anti-perfume: “L’Eau Serge Lutens.”

Serge Lutens

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Books

L’Esprit Serge Lutens: The Spirit of Beauty (Editions Assouline, Paris, 1992)

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Serge Lutens (Editions Assouline, Paris, 1998)

Bookcover

Photographer, make-up artist, interior and set designer, creator of perfumes, fashion designer and designer of extraordinary objects, autodidact Serge Lutens is an “image maker” of genius. He first began working for French “Vogue” in 1963 where he worked with, among others, Bob Richardson, Richard Avedon, Guy Bourdouin and Irving Penn. At the age of only 27, already acclaimed for his inimitable style, he moved to Dior to develop the company’s image and create their make-up lines, after which he transferred his talents to Shiseido, where he has been “image creator” for over 15 years. He divides his time between Paris and Ben Youssef, the medina in Marrakech, and his work reflects a sophisticated blend of European refinement and rich orientalism, taking the femme ideale, or ideal woman, as its central motif. His first book – published in 1992 and now a collector’s item – was an “event” in the publishing world. Today, with his second book, produced in luxury edition, Serge Lutens returns to reconfirm his art, which brings together pure aesthetics and a quest for perfection.

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Serge Lutens currently lives in Marrakech, Morocco.

2012 serge LutensSerge Lutens, 2012
.info: http://en.sergelutens.com/all-about-serge-lutens/serge-lutens.html

Agnieszka Osipa, Costumes inspired by Slavic Fairytales

7 Aug

Agniezska Osipa

Poland based costume designer Agnieszka Osipa creates a wardrobe for another world. Another time. Her creations turn modern women into mythic royalty — protectors of ancient lands. 

Osipa draws inspiration from painting and folklore. As a girl, she was fascinated by folklore and felt inspired by Eastern European traditions. This surreal mythology has helped form her artistic style.

Yes they are often added to my design process,” Osipa says. “This is where I am from, and I feel that Slavic culture is often regarded as minor compared to other cultures of the world, I try to change that by showing how rich and inspiring it can be, when you really dig into it.

She graduated from the Lodz Academy of Fine Arts, with diploma in fashion design.

Agniezska Osipa

Agniezska Osipa

Agniezska Osipa

Agniezska Osipa

https://www.facebook.com/Agnieszkaosipadesigner

Agniezska Osipa

Agniezska Osipa

Agniezska Osipa

Agniezska Osipa

https://www.instagram.com/agnieszkaosipa/?hl=nl

Agniezska Osipa

Agniezska Osipa

Agniezska Osipa

info: http://sobadsogood.com/2016/04/05/darkly-beautiful-fashion-inspired-slavic-fairytales/

Agniezska Osipa

Agniezska Osipa

Agniezska Osipa

Inspired by Swans

24 Jul

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Beautiful and Proud
reflecting on Nights Water
is Tomorrow’s Swan

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Tim WalkerTim Walker

Tim Walker

Tim Walker

Tim Walker

tim walker

Tim Walker

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Headpiecesfly

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kate moss by steven klein

Alexander McQueen

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Alexander McQueen

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Alexander McQueen

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Anna Pavlova

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Anna Pavlova's White Swan costumeAnna Pavlova's White Swan costume

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Daniela Gregis & a Not so Well Informed Blogger….

10 Jul
Daniela GregisDaniela Gregis

Looking for information about designer Daniela Gregis, I stumbled upon an article I’d like to share. Not because it’s a great article, but because of the nonsense written in the article. 

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The Article

This is the point in my fashion career where I start to get mean.  Not because I want to, but because I have to.  Otherwise, it just wouldn’t be right.

I received an invitation to attend the Daniela Gregis Fashion Show for the AW2016/2017 collection during the Milan Fashion Week, and I was very excited to attend.  Fashion Show invites are hard to come by for relatively unknown fashion bloggers and you can read about how to make the most of the Milan Fashion Week for Beginner Bloggers in the article I wrote for the Independent Fashion Bloggers website.

The experience started off a little odd because I got there early wanting to read the press kit to find out more about the designer and the collection.  I tried to do some research online but found literally NOTHING about the brand.  A website with little more than a vague, cryptic description of dissonant phrases, plus the brand has NO SOCIAL MEDIA PRESENCE WHAT SO EVER!

None.

What?  In this day and age how can a brand even think about selling with absolutely no social media, and yet this is NORMAL, especially for Italian brands who have already established their distribution channels pre-the internet age.

This is still shocking to me, but as a manager and marketer I get it (I think of it as the coward’s way out), but I get it.  I even put together some tips on how fashion bloggers can ease brands into social media in this article for the Independent Fashion Bloggers website.

Don’t Fear The Negative

In the article I mention above, one of the reasons I presume brands shy away from social media is that they fear the negative publicity that can occur from “online shaming”.  Negative tweets, Instagram images with too few likes, critical comments on Facebook, they are all possibilities once you put your designs out there for the world to see.

But here’s the thing.  If you truly stand behind your brand and designs you should be willing to accept the critiques of your followers, buyers and fans along with those of the people who do not buy your brand.  I mean, feedback is one of the best aspects of social media.

You don’t need to listen to everything being said, but believing enough in your brand and designs to participate in a two-way conversation is part of the fashion game now a days.

Daniela Gregis, Clothes for Old Ladies Who Want To Look Like Old Ladies

I have nothing against Daniela Gregis, and it would be wrong of you to think that by referring to her designs as “old lady clothes” I am being negative.  Actually, quite the contrary.  In a world where designers are feverishly making clothes for thin, “Goddess like” women who are all over 5’10” with no hips …I am getting TIRED OF THE SAME OLD.

That being said, Daniela Gregis is an “old lady”, and by old lady I mean a mature woman well into her 60s if not 70s.  It is clear that her collections are targeted to women such as herself, and indeed she furthers this point by actually walking her “catwalk” herself.

Her designs are a very specific blend of unsewn “rawcut” edges, hand knits, asymmetrical shapes and taffeta mixed with  cotton.  A very particular style worn by granola eating, hippy Italians (if granola actually existed in Italy), the whole flavor of the collection was “nonna” aka “Grandmother”.

She is surprisingly well distributed in some of the country’s more prominent stores and her brand is less of a brand than a reflection of herself and her moods.

The only piece of informative text that was to be found in the press kit was a small blurb in English and Italian that went something like this:

“Daniela Gregis laughs, worries, gets angry and has a little present for everyone…friends, relatives, cousins, artists, children, mothers and perfect strangers exchange roles, interact and shape some always new and entertaining creations*creatures…”.

Although I personally would never wear this style, and find it a little sad when fashion moves toward craft and away from the sartorial roots that Italy should be known for, there are things that I do like about her collection.

I appreciate how purposefully unsexy all of the shapes are, intended to create voluminous spaces to house the body while not accentuating any particular aspect of its femininity.  This could be something I seek out as I enter the second half of my life! Who knows!

You don’t need me to tell you that mature women are making waves in the fashion world.  The number of 40+, 50+ and 60+ fashion bloggers is on the rise and for good reason.  Surprisingly enough, main stream fashion has not caught on to the trend fully and only a handful of brands from cosmetics to clothing are really serving and reaching out to this demographic.

A few years ago, I was responsible for putting together a catalogue for one of our luxury exotic leather belt lines.  It was a few weeks before our presentation at a  fashion fair in Paris and I contacted a 50 year old ballerina to be the model for the catalogue.  OH THE CRITICISM I RECEIVED!!

Why did you get such an old model? What did you find so perfect about her? Why didn’t you use a regular model?

Let’s think about it.  How many 17 year olds do you know who can afford 650 euro for an alligator belt? And more importantly,  of the 17 year olds in the world that CAN afford our belts, how many of them are interested in spending their money on “classic” designs as opposed to the latest trend that some rap singer is wearing!?

My audience is NOT 17 year old models, why should I use them to speak to the women who are potentially my clients?  And yet, this decision was poopoo’d upon.  I would like to set the record straight that I am ahead of the times, because the following year, it seemed like beautiful “blue haired” models where in all of the catwalks, a token symbol with little substance of fashion’s willingness to represent who they actually sell to.

But I digress,  Although Daniela Gregis’ collection is not my style I applaud the fact that she is creating clothes for the more than “mature” audience and is willing to put herself in the limelight to prove her style’s wearability.

Now, if she was on social media she would know about this review!  Social Media and “the internet” is not something every over 60 year old has embraced, so I will just assume that her lack of social media presence is part of the technology age gap and less about social media fears.

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My Response

This fashion blogger did some research on the internet and found nothing on the brand,  plus the brand has NO SOCIAL MEDIA PRESENCE WHAT SO EVER! In this day and age how can a brand even think about selling with absolutely no social media, and yet this is NORMAL, especially for Italian brands who have already established their distribution channels pre-the internet age.

Everybody has the right to determine how to run their company. How and if to promote their brand. Because there’s the possibility to work with social media, doesn’t mean you have to promote on social media. There are brands that choose to not promote at all, also brands which are relatively young, like for instance Paul Harnden Shoemakers. A very sought-after brand, although almost nothing is known about the designer.

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one of the reasons I presume brands shy away from social media is that they fear the negative publicity that can occur from “online shaming”.  Negative tweets, Instagram images with too few likes, critical comments on Facebook, they are all possibilities once you put your designs out there for the world to see.

For some brands, the clothes/collections speak for themselves. Some fashion bloggers have the idea they can make or break a collection, but they’re overestimating the power of social media.

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But here’s the thing.  If you truly stand behind your brand and designs you should be willing to accept the critiques of your followers, buyers and fans along with those of the people who do not buy your brand.  I mean, feedback is one of the best aspects of social media.

You don’t need to listen to everything being said, but believing enough in your brand and designs to participate in a two-way conversation is part of the fashion game now a days.

If you truly stand behind your brand and designs, you don’t need a two-way conversation. Maybe for designers who only want to please their customers, feedback is a good aspect….

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That being said, Daniela Gregis is an “old lady”, and by old lady I mean a mature woman well into her 60s if not 70s.  It is clear that her collections are targeted to women such as herself, and indeed she furthers this point by actually walking her “catwalk” herself.

The “old lady” on the catwalk is not Daniela Gregis, but the beautiful model and actress Benedetta Barzini!!!! If the writer of the article had taken five minutes to to do some research online, she would have found out Daniela Gregis is the woman in the photograph above this post, like it took me five minutes… 

Benedetta Barzini has been modeling for many decades. Discovered on the streets by Consuelo Crespi in 1963, Diana Vreeland soon spotted her potential as a model and arranged a photo shoot with Irving Penn, which established her successful fashion career in New York. She also worked with other notable fashion photographers such as Bert Stern and Richard Avedon. Barzini graced the cover of the first issue of Vogue Italia in November 1965. In December 1966, she was named one of the “100 Great Beauties of the World” by the American fashion magazine Harper’s Bazaar.

Benedetta Barzini. Photo by Irving Penn. Vogue, September 1968.Benedetta Barzini, Ph. by Irving Penn. Vogue, September 1968
Steven Meisel , Romeo Gigli ,Benedetta BarziniBenedetta Barzini, ph.Steven Meisel for Romeo GigliBenedetta Barzini in a brown, cowled linen dress by Christian Dior, photo by Avedon for Vogue 1967Benedetta Barzini, ph. Richard Avedon, Vogue 1967 Vogue US, January 1965. Bert Stern. Benedetta Barzini.Benedetta Barzini,ph.Bert Stern, Vogue US, January 1965 Gregis-RF16-0148_img_400_665 Benedetta Barzini in Daniela Gregis show

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A very particular style worn by granola eating, hippy Italians (if granola actually existed in Italy), the whole flavor of the collection was “nonna” aka “Grandmother”.

I appreciate how purposefully unsexy all of the shapes are, intended to create voluminous spaces to house the body while not accentuating any particular aspect of its femininity.  This could be something I seek out as I enter the second half of my life! Who knows!

Daniela Gregis collection is sold by the Dover Street Market stores (multilevel fashion retail and concept stores created by Rei Kawakubo of Japanese fashion label Comme Des Garçons) in London, Tokyo and New York, together with Raf Simons, Vetements, Gucci, Dior and The Row (the luxury brand by Mary-Kate and Ashley Olsen). So maybe the writer of the article doesn’t get the style of clothes Gregis designs…… ? 

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You don’t need me to tell you that mature women are making waves in the fashion world.  The number of 40+, 50+ and 60+ fashion bloggers is on the rise and for good reason.  Surprisingly enough, main stream fashion has not caught on to the trend fully and only a handful of brands from cosmetics to clothing are really serving and reaching out to this demographic.

Wow,mature 40+, 50+ and 60+ fashion bloggers are on the rise….! What could they have to say? And do they need special brands? 

I think “mature women” could know a lot more about fashion, then the writer of the article. And “mature women”, like Anna Wintour, Franca Sozzani, Miuccia Prada, Pat McGrath, Grace Coddington and many more still dictate fashion today…..

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Now, if she was on social media she would know about this review!  Social Media and “the internet” is not something every over 60 year old has embraced, so I will just assume that her lack of social media presence is part of the technology age gap and less about social media fears.

The writer of the article is on social media, so I assume one day she will know about this review and find out, Daniela Gregis is not “over 60 years old” and her collections are sold in the trend setting Dover Street Market stores and are not (only) made for the “mature women” in the second half of their lives…. 

If you want to be a great fashion blogger, respect choices people/brands make, do good research before you start writing and don’t overestimate the social media!

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A/W 2016/’17  Daniela Gregis

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info: http://reasonstodress.com/danielagregis/