Vanessa Paradis, Singer-Songwriter, Musician, Actress, Model & incredibly Sexy

18 Nov

vanessa-paradis-black-white-french-vogueVanessa Paradis, ph. Inez & Vinoodh , Vogue France
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Vanessa Chantal Paradis (born 22 December 1972) is a French singer-songwriter, musician, actress, model and since 1991 a spokesmen for Chanel.

Short Biography


paolo-roversiph. Paolo Roversi

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Vanessa Paradis is daughter to interior designers Corinne and André Paradis. She began to develop her singing career at age seven when her uncle, record producer Didier Pain, helped her appear on the local television program, a talent show for child singers.

She recorded her first single, “La Magie des surprises-parties”, in 1983 and performed it in an Italian festival in 1985. Although not a hit, it paved the way for the song with which she became internationally famous, “Joe le taxi“, in 1987 when she was 14. It was No. 1 in France for 11 weeks and, unusually for a song sung in French, was released in the United Kingdom, where it reached No. 3. It was taken from her first album M&J (it stands for Marilyn & John).

Vanessa Paradis

90s

In March 1989, at age 16, Paradis left high school to pursue her career.

She released the album Variations sur le même t’aime in 1990, containing a remake of the Lou Reed song “Walk on the Wild Side“. The album was written by acclaimed French composer Serge Gainsbourg, whom she met when she received the best singer award at Les Victoires de la Musique, on 4 February 1990. The same year, Paradis won the César Award for Most Promising Actress for her role in Noce Blance.

In 1991, she promoted the fragrance Coco for Chanel. In the advertisement, she was covered in black feathers, portraying a bird swinging in a cage. The advert was shot by Jean-Paul Goude. 

In 1992, Paradis moved to the United States to work with Lenny Kravitz, whom she also dated at the time. The new album was her first in English. Written and produced by Kravitz, the album, titled Vanessa Paradis, topped the French chart. One of the singles from it was “Be My Baby“, which made number 5 in France and gave her another Top 10 hit in the UK.

In March 1993, Paradis started her first international tour, the Natural High Tour. In April 1994, she filmed Élisa, under the direction of Jean Becker. Elisa was a big success in France, and was released internationally.

From 1997 on, she played in movies with the great French actors/actresses.

Ligne Cambon, Chanel handbags

Chanel's Ligne Cambon

Chanel's Ligne Cambon

The New Mademoiselle, Chanel handbags

ph. by Karl Lagerfeld

chanel-new-mademoiselle-by-karl-lagerfeld

vanessa-paradis-and-chanel-new-mademoiselle-bag-gallery-1

In 2004, Paradis promoted Chanel’s new handbags called Ligne Cambon. The next year, she modeled for Chanel again for The New Mademoiselle handbag. In 2008, she modelled for Miu Miu.

Miu-Miu Fall/Winter 2008

Ph.Mert Alas & Marcus Piggott

mert-alas-and-marcus-piggott

miu-miu-mert-alas-marcus-piggott

miu-miu-mert-alas-and-marcus-piggott

Vogue Paris cover

d6aa3d3610ac68e64741c200ad519a0b ph. by Mert Alas & Marcus Piggott
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Paradis released a new album (Divinidylle) in 2007. She started the Divinidylle Tour in October. Paradis won two ‘Les Victoires de la Musique‘ awards for this album in February 2008. 

Canadian film director Jean-Marc Vallée cast Paradis in a starring role in his film Café de Flore, in which she plays the single mother of a down syndrome child in the 1960s. She garnered a Genie Award for Best Actress in a Leading Role at the 2012 Genie Awards.

Vanessa Paradis

In 2010 she became the face of Chanel’s new lipstick, Rouge Coco. She also became the face of their new handbag line, Cocoon. 

Paradise’s 2011 international tour included performances in the United States, Canada, the United Kingdom, Europe and Turkey.

In May 2013, Vanessa Paradis released a new album, Love Songs. And this year she starred in the movie Yoga Hosers with her daughter Lily Rose (by ex-husband Johnny Depp), as a history teacher. She also was a member of the main competition jury of the 2016 Cannes Film Festival.

Vogue Paris December/January ’15/’16

ph. by Inez & Vinoohd

vanessa-paradis-vogue-paris-december-2015-cover3-624x814

Vogue cover

Vogue Cover

Vogue Paris Vanessa Paradis, Inez & Vinoohd

Vogue Paris Vanessa Paradis, Inez & Vinoohd

photo-inez-est-vinoodh-vanessa-paradis-vogue-paris-december-2015january-2016

Vogue Paris Vanessa Paradis, Inez & Vinoohd

Vogue Paris Vanessa Paradis, Inez & Vinoohd

vanessa-paradis-by-inez-vinoodh-for-vogue-paris-december-january-2015-2016-9

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info: wikipedia

 

bruce-weberVanessa Paradis by Bruce Weber

 

 

Stella Jean, self-taught Italian-Haitian Designer

23 Oct

Stella Jean

Stella Jean (born 1979) is an emerging Haitian-Italian fashion designer and former model, whose cultural identity often provides inspiration for her eponymous label.

Jean was born and raised in Rome to a Haitian mother, Violette Jean, and an Italian father, Marcello Novarino. She studied political science at Sapienza University of Rome, before dropping out to model for Egon von Fürstenberg, fashion designer and ex-husband of Diane von Fürstenberg. It is here where she realized that she would rather make the clothes than wear them.

F/W 2012-’13 collectionstella-jean f/w 2012-'13

stella-jean f/w 2012-'13

stella-jean f/w 2012-'13

stella-jean f/w 2012-'13

She began receiving attention at Italian Vogue’s “Who Is On Next” contest in 2011, when she won second place, after she twice failed to qualify. Jean was rewarded with €5,000, which gave her the chance to establish her label and produce her next collection, which she showed in Rome, with the help of a Milan-based showroom. ‘It was pretty tough at the beginning. I didn’t even know how to buy fabric, pay factories, how much fabric was needed, and so on. But I had constant support from Alta Roma and the editors at Italian Vogue.’

Jean has since garnered the support of industry heavyweights, such as Suzy Menkes , and most of all, Giorgio Armani , who personally selected her spring/summer 2014 collection to show at his 550- Teatro show space in Milan, as well as lending his communications team – the first time he has ever shared both with another designer.

S/S 2013 collectionStella Jean s/s 2013

Stella Jean s/s 2013

Armani’s gesture proved to be a cornerstone moment in her career. The collection that Jean sent down the runway was full of bold colours and mismatched patterns in ladylike 1950s and 60s silhouettes. The models wore knotted fabric headbands and coloured flowers in their hair, shirts were knotted over colourful bras, waists were nipped in and the oversized accessories were as riotous as the clothes. Jean took her final bow wearing a T-shirt that read grazie mr armani. They had met two days previously at an event organised by Italian Vogue and Jean was so overwhelmed that she cried in front of him. ‘I felt so small talking to such a giant,’ she told me. During the show he wasn’t sitting in the front row, but appeared backstage to congratulate her. He had watched from behind the scenes and loved it.

S/S 2014 collection Stella Jean s/s 2014

Stella Jean s/s 2014

Stella Jean s/s 2014

Stella Jean s/s 2014

Stella Jean s/s 2014

 

For her spring/summer 2014 collection, Jean travelled to Burkina Faso, west Africa, with the International Trade Centre’s Ethical Fashion Initiative, a United Nations project, to source local fabrics in underprivileged areas. She met artisan weavers and embroiderers and, overwhelmed by the wealth of talent, returned home brimming with hand-woven striped fabrics and ideas. In April 2014 she was selected by the Victoria and Albert Museum in London to exhibit several outfits in its Glamour of Italian Fashion 1945-2014 exhibition.

S/S 2015 collectionStella Jean s/s 2015

Stella Jean s/s 2015

F/W 2015 collectionStella Jean f/w 2015-'16

Stella Jean f/w 2015-'16

Stella Jean f/w 2015-'16

Jean’s heritage and family continue to inspire her. For womenswear she cites photographs of her mother and grandmother, hence the 1950s and 60s silhouettes of her clothes, with a cinched-in waist and exaggerated fullness at the hips. For her menswear line she draws on memories of her late father’s classic Italian style. She calls it a ‘wax and stripes philosophy’: the wax fabrics from her mother’s heritage combined with the stripes from her father’s shirts from Turin. She describes her own personal style as ‘mannish’. ‘I do wear feminine circle skirts on occasion, but I’m usually dressed like a man, often in men’s clothes. I was very close to my father so I wear some of his things. And I love Church’s shoes.’

S/S 2016 collectionStella Jean s/s 2016

stella-jean-ss-2016

F/W 2016-’17 collectionStella Jean f/f 2016-'17

Stella Jean f/f 2016-'17

stella-jean-fw-2016

S/S 2017 CollectionStella Jean s/s 2017

Stella Jean s/s 2017

Stella Jean s/s 2017

Stella Jean s/s 2017

Stella Jean s/s 2017

The Gansey, originally designed for Fishermen.

2 Oct

Gansey

To me the sexiest outfit for a man is a (preferably hand-knitted) woollen sweater and corduroy trousers. The most beautiful sweater of all is the gansey or guernsey, originally designed for fishermen.

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History

The Guernsey’s knitting industry  can be dated back to the late 15th century when a royal grant was obtained to import wool from England and re-export knitted goods to Normandy and Spain. 

The gansey came into being as a garment for fishermen who required  a warm, hard-wearing, yet comfortable item of clothing that would resist the sea spray. Using a tightly spun 5-ply worsted wool (popularly known as “Seamen’s Iron”) the intricately patterned gansey is knitted in one piece on five steel needles. The patterning to back and front and, in some cases, the upper part of the sleeve provides an extra layer of protection, while the combination of seamless construction, fine wool and tight knitting produced a garment that is both wind and waterproof. Indeed, every part of the garment is designed with practicality in mind.

Ganseys

Ganseys

The gansey came into being as a garment for fishermen who required  a warm, hard-wearing, yet comfortable item of clothing that would resist the sea spray. Using a tightly spun 5-ply worsted wool (popularly known as “Seamen’s Iron”) the intricately patterned gansey is knitted in one piece on five steel needles. The patterning to back and front and, in some cases, the upper part of the sleeve provides an extra layer of protection, while the combination of seamless construction, fine wool and tight knitting produced a garment that is both wind and waterproof. Indeed, every part of the garment is designed with practicality in mind.

The wool is knitted tightly so as to “turn water”; the lack of seams ensures greater strength and impermeability; the underarm gusset allows freedom of movement; the lower sleeves where most wear is sustained, are left plain so the worn part can be unravelled and re-knitted, while the patterning across the chest provides extra insulation. Note that the patterning is the same, back and front. This means that the gansey is reversible, so that areas which come in for heavier wear, such as the elbows, can be alternated. They were traditionally knitted by the fishermen’s wives and the pattern passed down from mother to daughter through the generations.

Knitting ganseys

Through trade links established in the 17th century, the gansey found favour with seafarers around the British Isles, and many coastal communities developed their own “ganseys” based on the original pattern. Whilst the classic gansey pattern remained plain, the stitch patterns used became more complex the further north the garment spread, with the most complex evolving in the Scottish fishing villages. The knitting patterns were important to  be able to identify men after a ship had sunk…..

It’s arguable that the use and wearing of ganseys throughout the British Isles for over a century and a half almost justifies the gansey for qualification as a national costume.

The ganseyTypical gansey worn by east coat Britain fishermen

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Two styles of Gansey exist: a plain “working” gansey and a “finer” example that was generally saved for special occasions and Sunday-best attire.  The “working” gansey design was kept simpler in order to reduce the amount of time and materials needed to produce. The sale of knitted garments to supplement family income was important to many island families and thus the garments that were sold were also of a simple design. It is estimated that a total of 84 hours was needed to complete a gansey: a simpler design could be produced faster than a more elaborate one.

The gansey that is still produced on the island retains much of the original design and patterns. The rib at the top of the sleeve is said to represent a sailing ship’s rope ladder in the rigging, the raised seam across the shoulder a rope, and the garter stitch panel waves breaking upon the beach. As a working garment, the gussets under the arm and at the neck are for ease of movement, as are the splits at the hem. Twenty-four principal patterns have been identified in Cornwall alone, each one again drawing inspiration from ropes, chains, waves, nets and sand-prints.

Ganseys with different knitting patternsDutch ganseys with different knitting patterns

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Worn as a source of pride and often knitted by prospective wives “to show the industrious nature of the woman he was about to marry”, the “finer” gansey was more elaborately patterned than its working cousin. 

The gansey’s tightly knitted fibres and its square shape, with a straight neck so that it could be reversed, make it a particularly hardy item of clothing. It is not uncommon for a gansey to last several decades and be passed down in families. Guernseys knitted for children were knitted to be “grown into” and often came down to the knee.

Shetland ganseyShetland gansey

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Book

In the Netherlands all fishing-villages had their own knitting pattern for ganseys.


Book cover

 

Dutch gansey

Gansey from Katwijk Gansey from Dutch village Katwijk

VISSERS TRUIEN

A Dutch book about ganseys with 60 knitting patterns 

To order for € 24,95 at :     http://www.forteuitgevers.nl/boek/visserstruien

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order

a traditional gansey, hand-knitted in one piece

http://www.flamboroughmanor.co.uk/flamboroughmarine/

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Gansey

Louise Bourgeois, inspires so many

18 Sep

louise-bourgeois-by-helmut-lang-1997Louise Bourgeois, ph. Helmut Lang, 1997
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Very Short Biography

Louise Bourgeois is widely considered to have been one of the most influential artists of the 20th century. In a career spanning seventy years, she produced an intensely personal body of work that is as complex as it is diverse. Bourgeois created sculptures in a wide range of media: unique environments, or ‘cells’, in which she combined traditional marble and bronze sculptures alongside the everyday objects imbued with a strong emotional charge (furniture, clothes and empty bottles); prints and drawings; and hand-stitched works made of fabric.

Louise Bourgeois

Louise Bourgeois

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Born in Paris, Bourgeois originally studied mathematics and geometry at the Sorbonne but switched to art in 1932. She moved to New York in 1938 upon her marriage to the American art historian, Robert Goldwater. Although she continued her artistic practice in America, her career evolved slowly. The Museum of Modern Art’s retrospective of her work in 1982, when she was seventy, marked a turning point. In an interview that coincided with the opening, Bourgeois explained that the imagery in her work, which deals with themes such as jealousy, violence, sexual desire, betrayal, fear, anxiety and loneliness, was wholly autobiographical and a form of catharsis. In 2000, she made the first sculpture in what would become an iconic series of giant spiders entitled Maman. She continued to work obsessively up until her death in 2010, aged ninety-eight.

Louise Bourgeois was born in 1911 in Paris and died in 2010 in New York. Her work is widely exhibited on the international stage and continues to inspire a rich body of academic and critical commentary. The Museum of Modern Art in New York has established an online digital catalogue raisonné of the 35,000 prints and illustrated books that she produced during her lifetime.

 

Robert Mapplethorpe inspired by

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Comme Des Garçons inspired by

Louise BourgeoisLouise BourgeoisCDG

CDG

spiral-woman-2003Louise BourgeoisCDG

Louise BourgeoisLouise BourgeoisCDG

CDG

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Simone Rocha inspired by

Simone Rocha returning to a touchstone inspiration—Louise Bourgeois, on whom Rocha wrote her art college thesis—as she revisited and elaborated ideas developed in seasons past. Her new collection was as evocative and distinctive as the previous few, but more circumscribed in its innovations. Which is fine, by the way—a designer on a hot streak has the right to catch her breath.

The influence of Bourgeois was evident from the first few looks, padded velvet ensembles assembled from undulating forms. She was there, too, in the collection’s reliance on tapestry fabrics woven from chenille: As Rocha explained after her show, Bourgeois’ family actually owned a tapestry factory, and Rocha had recently seen a show of Bourgeois’ work utilizing the material. The tapestry looks here either played to the fabric’s stiffness, as in the various tailored looks, or fought it bitterly, wrapping the material around the body and/or forcing it into sculptural ruffles. Rocha described the process as “getting her body into the process,” an apt phrase given the muscularity of these looks. Elsewhere, Rocha took a new whack at the naked floral dresses she sent out for Spring, embroidering chenille yarn onto tulle to create William Morris-esque patterns.

louise-bourgeois-untitled-2002Louise BourgeoisSimone Rochas

Simone Rochas

Simone Rochas

Simone Rochas

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Louise Bourgeois’s Final Act

photographed by Alex van Gelder

Louise Bourgeois's Final Act, ph. Alex van Gelder

Louise Bourgeois's Final Act, ph. Alex van Gelder

Louise Bourgeois's Final Act, ph. Alex van Gelder

louise-bourgeoiss-final-act

Louise Bourgeois's Final Act, ph. Alex van Gelder

Louise Bourgeois's Final Act, ph. Alex van Gelder

Louise Bourgeois's Final Act, ph. Alex van Gelder

louise-bourgeois-by-alex-van-gelder-for-w-magazine-2010

 

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info: http://www.theeastonfoundation.org/biography

https://designandculturebyed.com/tag/louise-bourgeois/

http://www.vogue.com/fashion-shows/fall-2015-ready-to-wear/simone-rocha

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Louise Bourgeois's Final Act, ph. Alex van GelderLouise Bourgeois’s Final Act, ph. Alex van Gelder

 

Manolo Blahník, Candy-Colored Shoes for Sofia Coppola’s movie Marie Antoinette

11 Sep
2a0334dd7f023e00d8b4ef97bd1686d3Kirsten Dunst as Marie Antoinette
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Blahník empathizes with Marie Antoinette. “When I was a little boy, my mother used to read to me and my sister pages of Marie Antoinette’s biography. I was very much aware of the unjust way that woman was treated by the lovely French people,” says the Spanish designer, the reigning king of sexy shoes. “I for one, I find her so inspiring. She died so badly, to pay for her sins. Yes she spent money that she shouldn’t, but she was young and bored.”Manolo Blaníck shoes for movie Marie Antoinette

Manolo Blaníck shoes for movie Marie Antoinette

Manolo Blaníck shoes for movie Marie Antoinette

Spending money they shouldn’t describes many of Blahník’s customers, though “should” and “shouldn’t” is up for debate. It was Madonna, after all, who described his footwear as “better than sex.”

I’m going to have this inscribed on my tombstone,” he says of the famous quote. But any woman who’s slipped on one of his slender stilettos and witnessed the magic it wreaks with her leg – cankles, be gone! – knows that it is absolutely true. So when Sofia Coppola needed a designer to recreate the period’s decadent shoes that were handed to the spoiled queen (Kirsten Dunst) on a posh pillow, she called on Blahník. Her film, “Marie Antoinette” is partly based on an Antonia Fraser biography of the queen that takes a particularly sympathetic tack, much like Manolo’s, on the subject. Movie buff Blahník started his homework by studying original 18th-century shoes in Paris. The Victoria and Albert museum in London gave him footwear that belonged to the French queen. “So I did some kind of a cross between academic and a little bit of fantasy,” he says. But then, his shoes – especially the film’s, a collection of candy-colored heels embellished with ribbon and buttons and beads – are a fantasy. “Indeed, that is the only thing I want to offer to people,” he says. “Of course, I’m like everybody else; I have to do black and brown shoes and a little bit of Mary Janes and satin, but my nature is kind of theatrical, simple and dramatic.”

Manolo Blaníck shoes for movie Marie Antoinette

Manolo Blaníck shoes for movie Marie Antoinette

Manolo Blaníck shoes for movie Marie Antoinette

Born in the Canary Islands, Blahník, now 73, studied literature before turning his attention to fashion. Today, he still handcrafts hundreds of shoes every year, starting with a careful sketch (“I drive everybody mad with my constant sketching,” he says), then following the process through, stitch by stitch. He didn’t even get the chance to bask in the glamour of moviemaking. Instead of on-set visits to “Antoinette” with Coppola, Dunst and Oscar-winning costume designer Milena Canonero, Blahník was hard at work back home. “My assistant was going to Paris, to try the things, but I’m a factory boy. I work in the factory. But yes, it was an incredibly tight collaboration between everybody in the film.”

Though he’s the most recognizable name in shoes, he was shocked at the play his confections received in the film. “I didn’t expect it,” he said. “I thought, under those big dresses you would see a glimpse, but the camera lingers for a moment on the shoes, and the ladies of the court are looking at the shoes, and it’s quite extraordinary how they captured it. I’m very, very pleased actually; it was a challenge for me, but I was very surprised.”

Manolo Blaníck shoes for movie Marie Antoinette

Manolo Blaníck shoes for movie Marie Antoinette

Manolo Blaníck shoes for movie Marie Antoinette

The fancy footwear’s gotten such a great reaction, he’s even been approached to make more Hollywood hoofs. “I have many other offers from this movie,” he says. “But I’m doing shoes for the time being.”

And in between the sketching and sewing, he’s traveling the country, signing thousands of shoes for hours and hours during personal appearances at Neiman Marcus stores. But after more than four decades, Blahník never tires of his chosen craft. “Sometimes I do these nonsense shoes, and sometimes I do incredible things that I like even now, after many years. If I do this job, it’s because I have a passion for legs, women’s legs, and that is why I still do it. Every day I just think about something and I go back to the drawing board.”

marie-antoinette-kirsten-dunst

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Manolo Blahník and Sophia Coppola in Conversation

Manolo Blahník: You may not know this, but I have been obsessed with Marie Antoinette ever since I was a child. My mother, also a fan, used to read Stefan Zweig’s biography to me and my sister at bedtime, over and over again, though she always stopped with the storming of the Bastille. What attracted you to the story? Was it Lady Antonia Fraser’s book?

Sofia Coppola: Oh, I always loved the idea of her and that period and the decadence and isolation from reality… and I loved Antonia’s book because she looked at her story from her point of view and was sympathetic in understanding what it must have been like for her. I think it’s easy to make her stupid, or a villain, and I liked taking her side. I was living in Los Angeles when I was working on the script and saw a lot of women, bored trophy wives, buying shoes to cheer themselves up. And I could imagine what it must have been like for her.

Sofia CoppolaSofia Coppola
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Manolo Blahník: I adore how you made it modern and relevant to today. It was very clever of you not to make another costume drama.

Sofia Coppola: Oh, thank you. I was really trying to do the opposite of Masterpiece Theatre, and not worry about being perfectly accurate, but more to capture the feeling of what it was like and make the audience feel like they are with them, not looking back at some other time. I wanted the dresses to feel new and lavish, not off a dusty shelf in a museum. And I thought that if she was alive, she would ask you to make her shoes.

Manolo Blahník: Thank you. I’m flattered! And how wonderful that you had access to Versailles, and to be able to shoot where events actually happened.

Sofia Coppola: Yes, it was a privilege to be able to shoot there, and it made it all so much better for us, even on an emotional level.

Manolo Blahník: Your film was actually a kind of culmination of my love for Marie Antoinette. I had pictured it in my head ever since I was young, and there it was on-screen, captured so beautifully, with so much attention to the tiniest detail. Every frame is picture-perfect. How important was it for you to tell the story aesthetically?

Sofia Coppola: Oh, I loved getting into the beauty of her world, which seems to make up so much of their day-to-day life —the rituals and decorating themselves and their spaces. I loved that they changed the curtains with the seasons.

Manolo Blahník: Your casting was genial! Marianne Faithfull as Maria Theresa of Austria; Judy Davis, marvelous as the Comtesse de Noailles; Rip Torn as Louis XV; your cousin Jason Schwartzman; and all those wonderful girls – Natasha Fraser Cavassoni, Victoire de Castellane, Camille Miceli in small cameos.

Sofia Coppola: Thanks, that was really fun to see them in that world and imagine them as real people. I love casting and worked with Fred Roos on this. I loved Judy Davis from Woody Allen’s film Husbands and Wives. I was happy to have Marianne! It was fun to do it in a little bit of a pop way, but I always tried to make them real.

Manolo BlahnickManolo Blahníck
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Manolo Blahník: I was beyond excited when I received the call from Milena Canonero – whom I consider to be one of the most important costume designers in film history – asking me to make the shoes for the film. Tell me about working with her.

Sofia Coppola: She’s incredible. I have so much admiration for her and how she works; her attention to detail is so impressive. She cares about a hem that’s miles away and really is involved in every detail and the hair and makeup.

Manolo Blahník: During one of the conversations I had with her, she said to me, “Don’t be academic. Think of Marie Antoinette as a modern woman.”

Sofia Coppola: Oh, that’s great. Milena’s so cool; she really got what I wanted to do and helped create her world. And even though her work is exquisite, she’s not precious about it. I always loved Marisa Berenson in that fur hood in Barry Lyndon that Milena did.

Manolo Blahník: I adore Marisa in Barry Lyndon. In fact, I adore everything about that film. It’s so chic! Did you watch any other Marie Antoinette’s in your research? I’m mad for Norma Shearer in W. S. Van Dyke’s 1938 version. It’s unbelievably outrageous, with those costumes by Adrian, Tyrone Power as Fersen, and the most wonderful chandeliers, which I later saw at Debbie Reynolds’s museum in Las Vegas. And Michèle Morgan in Jean Delannoy’s film [1955]. Kirsten Dunst was perfect casting, though; she was exquisite.

Sofia Coppola: Oh, yes, I love the Hollywood version! I wanted to make something as over the top, but that felt real, and show her as a young girl.

Manolo Blahník: I always find the scene when the young Antoinette is handed over to the French on the island near Kehl incredibly poignant. The poor girl, stripped of everything Austrian, to be replaced by French clothing, and to suddenly find herself having to adhere to the rigors of court etiquette. You captured that so beautifully.

Sofia Coppola: Oh, thanks. I couldn’t believe they really did that – took her dog and her underwear. I loved what Antonia wrote about those important details; they said so much to me about her situation.

 Watch the full movie:   https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GoYozK0WasY

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Book

Book cover

Manolo Blahník: Fleeting Gestures and Obsessions

The first comprehensive and lavishly illustrated volume to document the influences and life work of Manolo Blahník, one of the most influential and talked-about icons in contemporary fashion. Featuring more than forty years of shoe design, this is the definitive monograph of the work of Manolo Blahník, one of the titans of contemporary fashion.

Manolo Blahnik: Fleeting Gestures and Obsessions

This book is a comprehensive survey of Blahník’s work and provides access to never-before-seen photography of designs. Drawing inspiration from the worlds of architecture, art, film, and literature, Blahnik is a master of the art of the shoe. His exciting use of color, unprecedented designs, and exquisitely sculpted heels make his shoes some of the most coveted in the world. Featuring more than 250 iconic designs from his archive, the book reveals for the very first time the inspirations behind his singular artistic vision.

Manolo Blahnik: Fleeting Gestures and ObsessionsWith insightful chapters devoted to Blahník’s most powerful relationships and inspirations—including Marie Antoinette, Diana Vreeland, Cecil Beaton, Spanish and Italian film, the works of Goya and Velázquez and the Prado Museum—this book is a personal look into the man behind the shoes. Beautiful photography and thoughtful essays by fashion writers, curators, and colleagues give readers a unique opportunity to access Blahník’s vivid and creative-filled world..

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manolo blahnikManolo Blahník
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info:

http://www.nydailynews.com

http://www.sothebys.com/en/news-video/blogs/all-blogs/sotheby-s-at-large/2015/12/manolo-blahnik-and-sofia-coppola.html

http://www.rizzoliusa.com/book.php?isbn=9780847846184