Search results for 'Veruschka'

Veruschka in perhaps the Most Epic Fashion Story

13 Jul
The Great Fur Caravan
Veruschka, Richard Avedon & Polly Mellen
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In 1966 Vogue did something extraordinary: a team was to Japan in the middle of winter to shoot perhaps the most epic fashion story of all time. The editorial was pre- PETA and it was dedicated to the beauty of furs. 

This editorial is often credited to Diana Vreeland, who was the magazine’s Editor-in-Chief at the time, but actually the editor on this story was Polly Mellen. It was one of her first assignments for Vogue and she set about on the five-week trip to Japan with supermodel Veruschka and legendary photographer Richard Avedon.

Fifteen trunks of clothes are hauled into the snow-covered mountains. Hairstylist Ara Gallant creates a wig eight feet long for Veruschka; Vreeland’s response when she sees the wig is, “I want 20 feet!”

The Great Fur Caravan, 1966

The Great Fur Caravan

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The Great Fur Caravan. A Fashion Adventure Starring the Girl in the Fabulous Furs Photographed for Vogue in the Strange Secret Snow Country of Japan…” took up a whopping 26 pages in the October 1966 issue. The Girl character was first introduced in the January 1963 issue as an idealized version of Diane Vreeland, sort of a dreamer, an adventurer. In Japan, the Girl takes a first class train to the middle of nowhere, where she explores the glorious snow mountains in her “fabulous” furs, and eventually falls in love with a gentle Japanese giant. It’s not like the story needed to make a lot of sense. It was dreamy and fantastical, and the type of travel story that Vreeland liked to entertain Vogue readers with. “The eye has to travel,” she famously said. Years later, Avedon remarked, “it’s without content. It’s without any meaning in it. It’s just this exquisite creature. Diana imagined her walking through the snows of Japan.”

The Great Fur Caravan

The Great Fur Caravan

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The story is rumoured to have cost $1 million dollars back in the day — that would be equal to $7 million today. But that’s how legends are made.

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Veruschka, the Amazonian Barbie

7 Apr

Veruschka by Avedon

Here I am. That was the only line uttered by Veruschka—famous enough in 1966 to play herself—in her classic scene from Michelangelo Antonioni’s Blow-up. But here was a case where action—those three minutes of leggy writhing on the studio floor for David Hemmings’ Bailey-esque fashion photographer—truly spoke louder than words.

It’s no exaggeration to say that Veruschka changed ­fashion for good. She was the first superstar model of the Sixties. Her six-foot frame, with its improbably long limbs, was revolutionary, ­following as it did the more womanly shapes of the models that came before her.

When the director Antonioni came to London in 1965 to film Blow-Up, the fashion movie that defined the decade, he cast Veruschka as the model who cavorts in front of the lens of the ­character based on David Bailey.

The part was only a cameo, lasting no more than five minutes, but it made her a superstar. Slinking like a cat toying with a mouse—half-naked on the floor in a beaded dress—while the photographer shouted encouragement (“Give it to me! Give it to me! . . . Work, work, work!”), she was sixties sexuality incarnate.

Veruschka in Blow-Up

Veruschka single-handedly started the trend to be super- thin; Twiggy burst on to the scene only once the film was in the can.

‘I was tall and I was thin. But just before shooting started I had been on a fashion assignment in Mexico and became terribly sick from drinking the water. I lost so much weight and was really ill and weak when I made the movie.’

Start of the super-thin trend: Veruschka admits she was too thin when she played a model who cavorts in front of the lens of the ­ it-fashion photographer in the film Blow Up. Dysentery. Not the most glamorous of muses for a new look.

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Veruschka’s scene in the film Blow Up has been voted the sexiest cinema moment in history

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Biography

Vera Gräfin von Lehndorff-Steinort or Veruschka von Lehndorff (born 14 May 1939 in Königsberg, East  Prussia, Russia) is a German model, actress, and artist who became popular during the 1960s. Known  professionally as Veruschka.

Vera’s father, Count von Lehndorff, is serving in the German army reserves when he witnesses Nazi atrocities in Balarus. The count takes part in the famous Operation Valkyrie plot to kill Adolf Hitler at the Wolf’s Lair. He is arrested the day after the conspirators’ bomb fails to kill the Führer.  “I have done this because I consider Hitler to be a murderer,” Von Lehndorff  tells the court at his trial. He is convicted and hanged. Vera and her sisters are separated from their mother and taken to a labor camp. “You will change your names and Hitler will educate you and you will never see your mother again,” the girls are told. Vera is five, her eldest sister seven.

In 1945 World War II ends in Europe. The von Lehndorff family is shattered, homeless, moving from place to place. Vera will attend thirteen different schools before studying at an art college in Hamburg.

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Although she had grown up dreaming of becoming an artist, she moved to Florence, where she was discovered at age 20 by the photographer Ugo  Mulas and became a full-time model.

In 1961 Veruschka, a twenty-something, aspiring model who stood more than six feet tall, is still going by her given name, moves to New York City. Her modeling career fails to take off. She is unable to secure even one booking, despite having met Eileen Ford, head of powerful Ford Modeling Agency. After a brief sojourn in Europe, she brings a new, exotic name back to Manhattan: Veruschka. “I dressed all in black and went to see all the top photographers, like Irving Penn,” she will later say. “And [I] said, ‘I am Veruschka, who comes from the border between Russia, Germany, and Poland. I’d like to see what you can do with my face.’ ”Her audacity, and her exoticism, are entrancing.

The transformation did the trick: Soon, everyone was clamoring to work with her. Richard Avedon called her “the most beautiful woman in the world.” (Her boyfriend, the photographer Franco Rubartelli, was reported to be jealous)

 Richard Avedon & Veruschka

Veruschka & Richard Avedon

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Franco Rubartelli & Veruschka

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For one landmark shoot, with Avedon and the fashion editor Polly Mellen, Veruschka spent three weeks in Japan, modeling exotic furs on icy peaks, on the slopes of a dormant volcano, and in a shogun’s shrine. “Fashion isn’t about being beautiful. It’s about never being forgotten once a photographer has seen you,” she once said.

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In 1963 she poses for Salvador Dalí as a living sculpture covered in shaving cream. Models for the first time in Vogue, in a fashion portfolio on the “new crepe chic” by Irving Penn. Called in for a meeting with Diana Vreeland. “She was charming and had a great  presence,” the Vogue editor in chief will later recall. “Her looks, of course, were superb.”

Veruschka & Dalí(Salvador Dalí & Veruschka)

In 1967 Veruschka is one of the highest-paid models in the world and she makes the cover of Life magazine. The accompanying feature is titled “Bizarre, Exotic, Six Feet Veruschka—The Girl Everybody Stares At.”

Grace Mirabella, the new editor of Vogue, brings her in to do a Paris collections portfolio in 1972. The makeup, however, takes five hours to apply—leaving the model exhausted by the time they are ready to shoot. “It absolutely showed in the pictures: They were dead; I had no expression,” she says. Mirabella and Condé Nast editorial director Alexander Liberman suggest she try a new look, “to cut my hair and be more like other models.” (Veruschka said about th disagreement, “Grace Mirabella wanted me to be bourgeois, and I didn’t want to be that”) Veruschka: “I said no. I realized it was no longer my moment. After that, I decided not to work in fashion again.”

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Sensing that her moment had passed, Veruschka retired from modeling in 1975. She reverted to her given name and rediscovered her first passion: art. Working with Holger Trülzsch, a painter and sculptor, she collaborated on photographic self-portraits in which her camouflage body paint blended into the background; they were an “exploration of visibility and disappearance, a near-perfect but uncomfortable analogy for [her] own life,” according to Frieze magazine.

Her first photo book, Veruschka: Trans-Figurations—in collaboration with artist Holger Trülzsch—is published in 1986. In the arresting images, her body is painted to appear clothed.

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In October ’94, Veruschka makes a surprise runway appearance at the Chanel spring show in Paris (“looking sensational,” one reviewer says).And in 2002 “Veruschka Voyage” is the title of designer Michael Kors’s latest collection for French fashion house Céline.

In 2006  Veruschka appears as Gräfin von Wallenstein in latest Bond flick, Casino Royale.

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Veruschka, a sumptuous $500 limited-edition coffee-table book, is published by Assouline. The foreword, by Richard Avedon, is reprinted from a May 1972 issue of Vogue.        

http://www.assouline.com/9782759402960.html

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Book cover Veruschka

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Veruschka: ‘It has not been hard to grow older, because I believe if you have something you believe in that will keep you alive far more than plastic surgery or Botox. I know that there are many things I could do, but I’m not interested. It’s more important to be loving and to have a lively mind.’

Occasionally Veruschka still appears on catwalks.

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Lauren Hutton, Facts of her Life & Career

27 Sep
Lauren HuttonPh. by Richard Avedon, 1973
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Lauren Hutton was advised to correct the slight gap in her teeth and tried using morticians’ wax to cover the gap, cutting a line in the middle of it; this was followed by the use of a cap, which she would often swallow, laugh out or misplace. She eventually retained this “imperfection”…..

Lauren Hutton

Hutton, who is now 71, was the Kate Moss of her time – almost as famous for her partying as for her incredible and enduring fashion career – and the outspoken beauty explained that there were millions of dollars to be made from modelling, even in the Seventies.

She was illiterate until age 11. After her mother remarried (Hutton never knew her father), the family of three moved from Charleston to the swamplands of Tampa, which she calls “a magical place.” Hutton spent her days as a carefree tomboy, and learned how to interact with wildlife from her stepfather.

She first came to NYC for a few-month stint, earning her rent as a “Lunchtime Bunny” at the Playboy Club. (She explained that the position of “Lunchtime Bunny” was reserved for 18-20 year-olds). She was there around the same time that Gloria Steinem and Debbie Harry were also working at the Club, although they never interacted, since the ladies who would later be known as the godmother of feminism and Blondie, respectively, had the distinction of being Nighttime Bunnies.

Lauren HuttonLauren Hutton as a Lunchtime [Playboy] Bunny
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She was born as Mary Laurence Hutton, but blame it on Playboy for the switcheroo: There were apparently too many cocktail waitresses named Mary, so she decided to riff on her middle name and go with Lauren, inspired by none other than Lauren Bacall.

Hutton got into moddeling after she saw a want ad in the New York Times for a Christian Dior model, “experience required.” Her friend’s boyfriend told her she needed to go to the audition anyway. “I said, ‘I don’t have experience,and he said, ‘Of course you do.’ I had my first great New York lesson: Lie.” She did get the job—though the fact that she offered to do it for less than minimum wage ($50 a week) was probably also a factor.

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Hutton about her first meeting with Vogue editor Diana Vreeland. “‘You have quite a presence,’ Vreeland told me. I did not know what presence meant.  I figured it was good. I said, ‘Yes ma’am, so do you.’ She said, ‘You stay after.’ I opened my book and she said, ‘I think I’ll call Dick [Avedon.]'” 

It was her first big shoot with famed photographer Richard Avedon, and things were not going well. “I was trying to be Veruschka, and that was terrible,” she says. When, in the hopes of finding something that would inspire her, Avedon asked her questions about her childhood, she revealed that she used to love jumping over snakes. He told her to leap and jump in the photo, and the rest was history. “That started the run-and-jump pictures…because I couldn’t model.”

Run-and-Jump Pictures by Richard Avedon

Lauren Hutton by Avedon

Lauren Hutton by Avedon

Lauren Hutton by Avedon

Lauren Hutton by Avedon

Lauren Hutton by Avedon 1971

Lauren Hutton by Avedon 73

She was the very first model to nab a beauty contract—and it was all her idea. Up until then, modeling was an occupation that was paid by the hour. But Hutton knew that she was a hot commodity. “Twiggy had quit, Veruschka was doing something else, Shrimpton was off doing something else—everyone had quit. I was the only one left!” But when she caught a glimpse of a New York Times article about a man who had received a $1 million contract for his own job, she said, “How can I do that?” She mentioned her idea to Avedon, who told her to up the ante and make it exclusive. She pitched it to Revlon, and in 1973, at age 31, she signed the first-ever modeling contract with Revlon for a sum of $400,000. She was the face of the mega-brand until they let her go about 10 years later.

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Lauren Hutton appeared on the front cover of Vogue magazine a record 41 times!

Lauren Hutton by Irving Penn, December 1968.

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Veruschka, Isabella Rossellini Lauren Hutton by Steven Meisel 1988.Veruschka, Isabella Rossellini Lauren Hutton, Steven Meisel 1988

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In October 2000, Hutton joined a motorbike group, which included actors Dennis Hopper, Laurence Fishburne and Jeremy Irons, to celebrate “The Art of the Motorcycle” exhibit at the Hermitage-Guggenheim museum in Las Vegas, Nevada. Prior to the journey, Hutton informed the Las Vegas Review-Journal: “I love the feeling of being a naked egg atop that throbbing steel. You feel vulnerable — but so alive.” En route, Hutton crashed near Hoover Dam, on the border between the US states of Arizona and Nevada, going over 100 miles (160 km) per hour, and suffered multiple leg fractures, a fractured arm, broken ribs and sternum, and a punctured lung. Hopper later recalled from before the start of the ride: “She had on a little helmet, sort of tied under her chin. It was cute. And Jeremy [Irons] came up to her and said, ‘You got to be kidding.’ He took it off her and gave her a proper helmet.”

Lauren Hutton

 

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About American Gigolo:

“Everyone knew it was great, that it was ahead of its time. Paul [Schrader] had been trying to get it made for ten years. He’s a genius idea man, and a genius producer. He was one of the first people to use popular music the way he did in that film, with Blondie. Originally, John Travolta had the lead role. He was fresh off of Saturday Night Feverand Grease, which together had made a quarter of a billion dollars. There were entire rooms in Paramount stuffed with his fan mail. What happened was, two weeks before we were to start, John’s mother died. He was just a 24 year-old kid. He was in real agony. Then his dad had a heart attack. So John asked for a two week extension so he could pull himself together emotionally, and also lose some of the weight he’d put on during this time. And they wouldn’t give him an extension. Everyone was going to sue him. It was just a mess. So what John had to do to get out of it, was give Paramount a deal where they chose his movies, and he had no say. And prior to that, John had what no other actor in town had, which was final cut. Plus, John was very romantic. If John had played the role, it would have been much more romantic and you would have seen the gigolo kiss. With Richard [Gere], you never really see the gigolo kissing. You see everything leading up to it. You see his expertise in dressing, more than his expertise at romance.”

“The character of Julian Kaye was a bit removed and completely narcissistic. It was his narcissism that blinded him to the conspiracy around him, but you would have had a populist hit if there had been more romance in the film. As it was, it wasn’t a hit when it came out, but became a classic in retrospect on cable and home video. So we ended up being lucky, because Richard is such a wonderful actor, and he became a star because of that role, deservedly.”

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Lauren Hutton

“We have to be able to grow up. Our wrinkles are our medals of the passage of life. They are what we have been through and who we want to be. I don’t think I will ever cut my face, because once I cut it, I’ll never know where I’ve been.” 

Lauren Hutton

 

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info:

Wikipedia

http://www.vogue.co.uk/news/2014/05/16/lauren-hutton-interview—model-on-fashion-and-dating

http://www.wma.com/lauren_hutton/bio/LAUREN_HUTTON.pdf

Apollonia Van Ravenstein, Model in the 70ties & 80ties and the Book written about Those Days

8 Dec

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When school pictures were taken, Apollonia Van Ravenstein always had to stand in the back, because of her height. At 15, the owner of a pantyhose factory , situated in her hometown Geldrop (Netherlands), asked her to pose for his new collection.  Apollonia sent him to meet her parents for approval. She was paid fl 75,- (€ 34,-) for the session, while her pocket-money was only € 11,- a month.

It was her brother Theo who convinced her to take the next step. He owned a hair salon in Berlin, Germany, and  was interested in fashion magazines. Theo told his sister, he believed she could become a professional model, made an appointment at the model agency of Corine Rottshäfer and accompanied Apollonia to Amsterdam. She was wearing a light-blue suit her mum had made for her. The other women at the agency were wearing fur coats, their hair up in a bun and too much make-up.

Within a month Apollonia was called ‘the face of 1970’ by the most important newspaper. She travelled to Milan, did a cover for Vogue, went to Paris and not long after took off to New York. The beginning of her model career was overwhelming. ‘You earn lots of money, you’re placed on a pedestal, but your inner grow suffers from these circumstances. The beginning of the 70ties was one big party, with lots of drugs and alcohol. I saw people in the fashion world who came to grief.’

Apollonia became well-known in the 70ties and 80ties. She modelled for Norman Parkinson, Richard Avedon and Irving Penn . Her pictures were in various magazines such as Vogue Magazine and Ambiance (1978 ). In 1972 she went to the United States and received an exclusive contract with American Vogue. Besides the modelling world, she was also active in the art and music scene. She met with Andy Warhol , who signed her, was one of Mick Jagger’s girlfriends and modelled for Playboy Magazine  in June 1978.

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Apollonia by Andy Warhol

Recently, september 11, 2013, these polaroids of Apollonia by Andy Warhol were auctioned.

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ANDY WARHOL (1928-1987)  Apollonia Von Ravenstein  four unique polaroid prints  each: 4¼ x 3 3/8 in. (10.8 x 8.6 cm.) Executed in 1982. One time use for world wide publication.Apollonia photographed by Andy Warhol
news_story_detail-Apollonia-van-RavensteinApollonia van Ravenstein. Circa 1978-1979Appolonia%20Van%20Ravenstein%20cover Apollonia on the cover of Andy Warhol’s Interview, June 1973

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She played a small role in the music video for Golden Earrings Quiet Eyes by Anton Corbijn in 1986.
Since the late 90s Apollonia van Ravenstein sails the seas, as hostess and interpreter on board luxury cruise ships of the Holland America Line . She is married to Captain Edward Zaane.

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Recently (November 2014) Apollonia was named in the biography by actress Anjelica Huston, who was Jack Nicholson’s other half during the 70ties and 80ties. Apollonia and Anjelica were friends, but after a onenightstand with Jack, Apollonia was no longer welcome in Anjelica’s house.

It’s said, Apollonia also had a brief encounter with Mick Jagger during those days (but who hasn’t).

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Irving Penn

US Vogue November 1, 1972 , Pale, Liquid…with Pearl at Night

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Albert Watson’s Twelve

Albert Watson’s Twelve was private edition of twelve 12″ x 10″ silver gelatin prints, with an additional print (the heels) tipped onto the box cover, that was produced for his major clients. Only 12 of these sets were made. 1978

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Avenue (Dutch magazine) May 1972

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Various pictures of Apollonia

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Model  by Michael Gross

Book cover

The definitive story of the international modeling business—and its evil twin, legalized flesh peddling—Model is a tale of beautiful women empowered and subjugated; a tale of vast sums of money, rape, both symbolic and of the flesh, sex and drugs, obsession and tragic death ; and of the most unholy combination in commerce: stunning young women and rich, lascivious men.  Overview of modeling industry and several supermodels. Models Persons Health Fitness Beauty Grooming Business Cindy Linda Christy Naomi Magazine Covers Tv Ads Supermodels Francine Counihan Jean Patchett Suzy Parker Celia Hammond Veruschka Lauren Hutton Apollonia Ravenstein Louise Despointes Gunilla Linblad Shelley Smith Janice Dickinson Mike Reinhardt Christie Brinkley Bitten Knudsen Tara Shannon Christine Bolster Veronica Webb.

Investigative journalist Michael Gross takes us into the private studios and hidden villas where models play and are preyed upon, and tears down modeling’s carefully constructed façade of glamour to reveal the untold truths of an ugly trade.

Model by Michael Gross. Published in 1995. 

http://www.amazon.com/Model-Ugly-Business-Beautiful-Women/dp/0062067907/ref=la_B001IQZ8ZM_1_6/184-0980824-6474223?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1386063564&sr=1-6

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The Froggies – Apollonia Von Ravenstein – 1985

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Johan Asherton’s hommage for Dutch actress/ model Apollonia van Ravenstein.

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Peggy Moffitt in Blow-Up & Comme Des Garçons

2 Dec

Peggy Moffitt (born in California in 1939) was during the 1960s a premier model and muse for the late fashion designer Rudi Gernreich. She developed a signature style that featured heavy, Kabuki-like makeup and an asymmetrical hair cut.

Though her unique look has now become iconic of the 60s fashion scene, Peggy started out pursuing a career in film, beginning with an uncredited role in the 1955 film ‘You’re Never Too Young’. As a model, she developed a signature style, including false eyelashes and heavy eye makeup, drawing on Japanese Kabuki theater. Her hairstyle, an asymmetrical bowl cut, created by Vidal Sassoon, became known as the ‘five point’. Her unique look became an icon of the 1960s fashion scene. In 1964, she made international headlines when she was photographed by her husband since 1960 William Claxton wearing Gernreich’s famous topless monokini bathing suit. Peggy was one of the few models bold enough at the time to model it…..

Peggy’s career in film never took off, but she appeared in a film entitled ‘Who Are You, Polly Magoo’ and in Michelangelo Antonioni’s ‘Blow-Up’.

Peggy Moffitt & Antonioni’s Blow-Up

‘A mod London photographer seems to find something very suspicious in the shots he has taken of a mysterious beauty in a desolate park’

Blow-Up is filmed in London during the sixties. David Hemmings leading movie-character, a fashion photographer, is based on David Bailey, who was the it photographer at the time.  Other people starring in the movie are: Vanessa Redgrave, Sarah Miles, John Castle and sixties model Veruschka. Also appearing in the movie are Jane Birkin, Peggy Moffitt and The Yardbirds.

The movie has become iconic for the theme, the cast and the fashion photo shoot scenes. The first is the scene with Veruschka and the second is the scene in which David Hemmings has to do a fashion shoot with five models (Peggy Moffitt among them).

The plot is a day in the life of a glamorous fashion photographer. It begins after spending the night at a doss house, where he has taken pictures for a book of art photos. He is late for a photo shoot with Veruschka at his studio, which in turn makes him late for a shoot with other models later in the morning. He grows bored and walks off, leaving the models and production staff in the lurch. As he leaves the studio, two teenage girls who are aspiring models (Jane Birkin plays one of them) ask to speak with him, but the photographer drives off to look at an antiques shop. Wandering into Maryon Park, he takes photos of two lovers. The woman (Vanessa Redgrave) is furious at being photographed. The photographer then meets his agent for lunch, and notices a man following him and looking into his car. Back at his studio, Redgrave arrives asking for the film, but he deliberately hands her a different roll. She in turn writes down a false telephone number to give to him. His many enlargements of the black and white film are grainy but seem to show a body in the grass and a killer lurking in the trees with a gun. He is disturbed by a knock on the door, but it is the two girls again, with whom he has a romp in his studio and falls asleep. Awakening, he finds they hope he will photograph them but he tells them to leave, saying, “Tomorrow! Tomorrow!”

As evening falls, the photographer goes back to the park and finds a body, but he has not brought his camera and is scared off by a twig breaking, as if being stepped on. The photographer returns to his studio to find that all the negatives and prints are gone except for one very grainy blowup showing the body. After driving into town, he sees Redgrave and follows her into a club where The Yardbirds, featuring both Jimmy Page and Jeff Beck on guitar, are seen playing. At a drug-drenched party in a house on the Thames near central London, he finds both Veruschka – who had told him that she was going to Paris, and when confronted, she says she is in Paris – and his agent, whom he wants to bring to the park as a witness. However, the photographer cannot put across what he has photographed. Waking up in the house at sunrise, he goes back to the park alone, but the body is gone.

Befuddled, he watches a mimed tennis match, is drawn into it, picks up the imaginary ball and throws it back to the two players. While he watches the mime, the sound of the ball being played is heard. As the photographer watches this mimed match alone on the lawn, his image fades away, leaving only the grass as the film ends.

The film grossed $20 million (about $120 million today) on a $1.8 million budget and helped liberate Hollywood from its puritanical prurience.

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Blow-Up fashion shoot scene

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Blow-Up scene with Veruschka

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http://www.amazon.com/Blow-Up-David-Hemmings/dp/B0000WN0ZK/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1353939241&sr=8-1&keywords=blow-up+dvd

After Gernreich’s death, she retained legal rights to his designs and arranged for his designs to be displayed in an art exhibition. She also collaborated with Marylou Luther and photographer Claxton to release a comprehensive book chronicling Gernreich’s designs.

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Peggy Moffitt & Comme des Garçons

Peggy’s resurge for the book led to contact with Comme des Garçons designer Rei Kawakubo and together they went over the Gernreich archives and selected key pieces to be re-created under the Comme des Garçons label as the Moffitt line, which also contained a series of t-shirts depicting Peggy Moffitt’s image…

The Chicago band The Handcuffs feature the song “Peggy Moffitt” on their debut album Model for a Revolution, with famous photographs of the revolutionary model on the CD cover. Boyd Rice and Giddle Partridge released a limited edition vinyl called Going Steady With Peggy Moffitt in 2008.

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Peggy Moffitt, Muse & Model for Rudi Gernreich

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