Kansai Yamamoto, from Ziggy Stardust to the Kansai Super Show

7 Feb

Kansai Yamamoto

Kansai Yamamoto ( born February 8, 1944) is one of the leaders in Japanese Contemporary fashion, in particular during the 1970s and 1980s.  Inspired by the colorful art of Japan’s Momoyama period (1568–1615) and traditional Kabuki theater, his exuberant designs contrast with the Zen-like simplicity and deconstructed silhouettes favored today by designers such as Yohji Yamamoto, Rei Kawakubo, and Issey Miyake.

Kansai was born in Yokohama, Japan. After studying civil engineering and English at Nippon University ,got a so-en prise at Bunka Fashion College in 1967 . The following year he opened his first boutique in Tokyo.

1971

kansai yamamoto

Kansai Yamamoto detail

Kansai yamamoto

Kansai yamamoto

Kansai yamamoto

In 1971, he launched his own company, Yamamoto Kansai Company, Ltd., Tokyo. His first collection debuted in London that same year, where his clothing was seen by David Bowie. Bowie later commissioned Kansai to create the wardrobe for his Ziggy Stardust stage persona. His floaty womenswear creations helped cement Bowie’s androgynous look during his Ziggy Stardust tour, and a long-term relationship was born. STOP……

I went to see the documentary film ‘David Bowie Is’ last night, in which Kansai Yamamoto took the stage and he told the actual story : one night he was called by a friend, who kept on telling Kansai he HAD TO GO TO NEW YORK to see something spectacular!! He finally gave in and went to New York to see the concert of David Bowie/Ziggy Stardust, not knowing what to expect. When Ziggy entered the stage, he was wearing an outfit by Kansai. Actually the entire show Ziggy was dressed in Kansai Yamamoto. Bowie had purchased many items of the Kansai Yamamoto collection, which was in fact a womenswear collection…….

They did become friends….

Ziggy Stardust wardrobe

David Bowie and Kansai Yamamoto in Japan, 1973

David Bowie and Kansai Yamamoto in Japan, 1973

David Bowie and Kansai Yamamoto in Japan, 1973

Kansai Yamamoto for Ziggy Stardust/Bowie

Bowie/Ziggy Stardust/Kansai Yamamoto

Ziggy Stardust/ Kansai Yamamoto

Davis Bowie wearing Kansai Yamamoto years after Ziggy Stardust finished

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Kansai’s first collection was sold in the USA at Hess’s Department Store in Allentown, Pennsylvania, a department store known for its controversial fashion shows of American and European styles selected for their potential to influence ready-to-wear clothing designs. (Rudy Gernreich’s topless bathing suit was first modeled at Hess’s in 1964). His 1975 debut in Paris was followed by the opening of his Kansai Boutique in 1977.

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Since his last collection for fall/winter 1992, Kansai has lent his name to licensed products ranging from eyeglasses to tableware. His fashion show spectaculars have become the framework for the grand Kansai Super Shows, the first of which was held in Moscow’s Red Square in 1993. Others held since in Japan, Vietnam, India, and Berlin have drawn audiences in the hundreds of thousands.

KANSAI SUPER SHOW

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Kansai Yamamoto designed the Skyliner train, unveiled in 2010, that connects Japan’s Narita Airport with central Tokyo.

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Vintage Kansai Yamamoto.

Kansai Yamomoto vintage clothing is very sought after. You can find it on : http://www.farfetch.com/nl/shopping/women/kansai-yamamoto-vintage/items.aspx

https://www.etsy.com/nl/search?q=kansai%20yamamoto&ref=auto1

 

Kansai Yamamoto

Kansai Yamamoto

Kansai Yamamoto

Kansai Yamamoto

Kansai Yamamoto

Kansai Yamamoto

Kansai Yamamoto

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Kansai YamamotoKansai Yamamoto

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info:

http://www.philamuseum.org/exhibitions/318.html

Joan of Arc, inspires because she’s a Symbol of Heroism and Strength

31 Jan
Paco Rabanne design, 1974Paco Rabanne design, 1974
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Who was Joan of Arc?

Joan of Arc, a peasant girl living in medieval France, believed that God had chosen her to lead France to victory in its long-running war with England. With no military training, Joan convinced the embattled crown prince Charles of Valois to allow her to lead a French army to the besieged city of Orléans, where it achieved a momentous victory over the English and their French allies, the Burgundians. After seeing the prince crowned King Charles VII, Joan was captured by Anglo-Burgundian forces, tried for witchcraft and heresy and burned at the stake in 1431, at the age of 19. By the time she was officially given the status holy in 1920, the Maid of Orléans (as she was known) had long been considered one of history’s greatest saints, and an enduring symbol of French unity and nationalism.

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Joan of Arc inspires fashion designers, photographers & magazines to the day, because she’s a symbol of heroism and strength

Alexander McQueen was very inspired by Joan of Arc. He based his fall/winter ’98 collection on her, but in many other collections he produced, you’ll find influences of Joan. And Sarah Burton, who is now head designer of Alexander McQueen, 

McQueen
Alexander McQueen, Joan of Arc collection f/w '98
Alexander McQueen FallWinter 200910
Alexander McQueen fw 98 'Joan'
2009-2010 Alexander McQueen

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Jean-Paul Gaultier

Jean- Paul Gaulthier Joan of Arc dress

Jean- Paul Gaulthier Joan of Arc dress

Jean- Paul Gaulthier Joan of Arc dress 1

gaultier

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John Galliano/ Dior

Haute Couture John Galliano

Lily Cole for Christian Dior

Natalia Vodianova in Christian Dior Haute Couture Fall 2006 by John Gallino

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Portayed as Joan of Arc

Emma Thompson as Joan of Arc - by Annie LeibovitzEmma Thompson, ph.by Annie LeibovitzMichelle as Joan of Arc. Herb RittsMichelle Pfeiffer ph. Herb Ritts
Alexander McQueenAlexander McQueen
044aa8e277426dce4f7fe7440076a5fcMadonna
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Marlies Dekkers

Fall/Winter 2014

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Marlies-Dekkers_FW14_2

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Marlies-Dekkers_FW14_3

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W Magazine

Dame of Thrones, ph. Tim Walker, September 2012

Tim-Walker-Dame-of-Thrones-W-MAgazine-Sept-2012-7--600x780

Tim-Walker-Dame-of-Thrones-W-MAgazine-Sept-2012-12--600x779

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My favorite Joan of Arc is Milla Jovovich in The Messenger: The Story of Joan of Arc, 1999.

Directed by Luc Besson.
Milla Jovovich as Joan of Arc from the Luc Besson movie.

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Joan of Arc inspired

Joan of Arc inspired

Katharine Hepburn, changed American Fashion

24 Jan

Cecil BeatonKatharine Hepburn, ph. Cecil Beaton
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Katharine Houghton Hepburn (May 12, 1907 – June 29, 2003) was an American actress. Known for her fierce independence and spirited personality, Hepburn was a leading lady in Hollywood for more than 60 years. She appeared in a range of genres, from comedy to literary drama, and she received four Academy Awards for Best Actress—a record for any performer. In 1999, Hepburn was named by the American Film Institute The Number One Female Star of All Time.

Katharine Hepburn

Katharine Hepburn

Hepburn was unparalleled in her ability to invent and maintain her own star image. She signed with RKO and went to Hollywood in the early 1930s when the Dream Factory was fixated on platinum blondes draped in sequins and feathers. But Hepburn was cut from a different template, and from the moment she stepped onscreen in the 1932 film A Bill of Divorcement, her unique image made her a “movie star.” Her highly-stylized personality and lanky physique signaled a radical departure from such screen sirens as Jean Harlow and Carole Lombard. Instead, Hepburn conveyed the essence of modernism—a woman who looked life straight in the eye.

Katharine Hepburn

Katharine Hepburn

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“I was a success because of the times I lived in. My style of personality became the style.”

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katharine hepburn



Book

RebelChic_KatharineHepburn_cover

Katharine Hepburn: Rebel Chic

The first book to celebrate the irreverent and original style of Katharine Hepburn — icon of stage and screen. Glamorous when she wanted to be and tomboyish when she didn’t, Katharine Hepburn developed her personal style and public image as a style rebel. Whether on stage, on screen, or in private life, Hepburn had a firm grasp on the power of her appearance. Rather than submit to studio image makers, she controlled her image and drew on her own proclivities to create a distinct antifashion persona. This book presents the famously headstrong star in a new light: as a style icon. Through images of Hepburn’s on-screen and off-screen wardrobes and essays by top fashion historians, this book reveals how modern Hepburn’s insouciance and idiosyncratic manner of dressing really was and shows her as an inspirational, self-styled counterpoint to the over-managed looks of celebrities today. Full of never-before-published images of Hepburn’s costumes and personal wardrobe, Katharine Hepburn is a refreshing look at a true fashion original..

Katharine Hepburn, ph. Richard AvedonKatharine Hepburn, ph. Richard Avedon

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Linda Evangelista as Katharine Hepburn
Ph. Steven Meisel for Vogue Italia

Linda Evangelista as Katharine Hepburn Ph. Steven Meisel for Vogue Italia

linda-evangelista-by-steven-meisel-vogue-italia

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Linda Evangelista as Katharine Hepburn Ph. Steven Meisel for Vogue Italia

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David Bowie, the Man who Inspired me the Most

17 Jan
David Robert JonesDavid Robert Jones
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This week David Bowie, the man who inspired me the most, passed away.

I am still speechless, so I’d like to share some photographs …..

David Bowie
David Bowie
David Bowie
David Bowie
David Bowie
david-bowieAs Andy Warhol in my favorite movie 'Basquiat'
David Bowie

David Bowie
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. David Bowie wearing Alexander McQueen                                                R.I.P. 

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Stephen Sprouse, never made it from Cult Figure to Legend (Part two)

10 Jan

Stephen Sprouse

In May 1984, when Sprouse showed his latest collection at the Ritz, a former club downtown, 2,500 people attended, including Andy Warhol. He loved Sprouse’s sixties-inspired clothes and afterward traded two portraits for the whole collection. “Sprouse was definitely one of Andy’s ‘children,’ ” says Benjamin Liu, who worked as Warhol’s assistant. “So much of what Andy was brilliantly known for—the neon colors, the Pop imagery, the association with musicians—Stephen brought into his own work.” Warhol, in turn, brought Sprouse into his life, inviting him for dinners at Odeon or Indochine that would lead to after-dinner excursions to Area, at the time the city’s hottest club.

Jean Pagliuso for American Vogue, November 1984Jean Pagliuso for American Vogue, November 1984
Steven Meisel for American Vogue, March 1988.Steven Meisel for American Vogue, March 1988.
Spanish VogueSpanish Vogue, Stephen Sprouse in the middle
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Sprouse had been in business only a short time but had quickly become a cult figure, his clothes prominently featured in major department stores and on the pages of Vogue and Harper’s Bazaar. He was part of Warhol’s coterie. Rock stars, like Madonna, wanted him to help style their images. But there was one way in which success eluded him: He was running out of money. From Halston, he’d developed a taste for expensive materials, but since no one was making Day-Glo fabric at the time, he turned to Agnona, the Italian luxury cashmere manufacturer. As a result, his clothes were priced too high for the youthful customers who gravitated to them. Then there were the production problems, as Sprouse insisted on doing things like hand-painting the graffiti on the clothes himself. By the spring of 1985, he owed $600,000 to creditors; that summer, Sprouse shut down his business. 

The press had a different kind of field day, and stories appeared with headlines like SPROUSE: HOW SUCCESS TURNED TO FAILURE. Sprouse, for the most part, kept his feelings private.

In September 1987, six months after he’d designed costumes for the New York City Ballet’s premiere of Ecstatic Orange—and after the sudden death of Warhol, who was buried in a Sprouse suit—Sprouse returned to fashion with the opening of his own store in a converted firehouse on Wooster Street. He was now in business with 24-year-old Andrew Cogan, whose father, Marshall, was chairman of GFI-International. At last, he had big money behind him. But the store was a risky venture—he would be the first designer to have a full-scale emporium in Soho. “There was nothing like this downtown,” says longtime friend Candy Pratts Price. “It was a real happening. A living environment.”

19841984
stephen sprouse, 19871987
'87 '88 ss1987-1988
met Museum, 19881988
ss 19881988

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Sprouse controlled almost every aspect, designing the interior, picking out the music, selecting the images for the massive video wall on the first floor. He created three different clothing lines, including a cheaper one for younger customers, as well as gloves, fishnets, hats, shoes, jewelry, even makeup. “The opening was unbelievable,” says Jamie Boud, Sprouse’s longtime assistant. “Debbie Harry played on a stage formed by a big red X. Stephen knew a lot of people, and they all showed up for him.”

He did two shows that year, one grown-up and sophisticated, with prints done in collaboration with Keith Haring, the other a Sprouse phantasmagoria, with models stumbling down the runway chewing capsules that gushed fake blood. “That show was critisized harshly ,” says Boud. “But Stephen thought it was the best one he’d ever done. He was into the showbiz of it all. The clothes were just costumes for the ‘show.’ ”

By 1989, Sprouse, in what was now becoming a familiar pattern, was once again unemployed. He lost his stores—he’d opened a second one in L.A.—and his wholesale business. “We were too crazily, overly ambitious,” admits Cogan. “At the end, we were doing close to $10 million worth of business, but it wasn’t enough. The clothing, particularly after that last show, which was a spectacular bomb, didn’t sell. Telling Stephen we couldn’t continue was the worst day of my life.” “After the store closed, Stephen was a little lost,” says Boud. “He was just a freelance guy at that point. He realized fashion was what he was best known for, but nothing about his career had ever been calculated.” He spent more time on his art, creating giant silk screens of rock stars, like Iggy Pop and Sid Vicious. He made costumes for Mick Jagger, Axl Rose, Trent Reznor, Courtney Love, David Bowie, and Duran Duran, and designed numerous album covers and backdrops for sets.

In 1996, Sprouse won the rights to use Warhol’s imagery on his clothing, which led to a deal with Staff International, an Italian company whose stable of designers included Vivienne Westwood. Sprouse returned to the runway in the fall of 1997 with a collection that paid homage to Warhol: Models wore the artist’s vivid Pop images on dresses and baggy raver-style pants. But when Staff was later bought out by another company, Sprouse’s license wasn’t renewed—a cruel irony, as fashion was then experiencing a retro-eighties moment and Sprouse’s designs were fetching high prices at vintage stores.

grafitti bag

Stephen Sprouse for louis VuittonIn the summer of 2000, Marc Jacobs asked Sprouse to go to Paris to help with his spring collection for Louis Vuitton. Jacobs, who’d known Sprouse from his own club days, had long been a fan, and arranged for him to stay at the Ritz, where Sprouse, staring at TV static one night, came up with the idea of creating floral prints using huge digitized cabbage roses. But it was Sprouse’s graffiti bag, on which he’d written, in raw painted lettering, louis vuitton paris, that became the big hit, with long waiting lists. Sprouse confided to Boud that even he couldn’t get one. Months later, he could—on Canal Street, where counterfeiters were selling them by the hundreds. “At least the knockoffs were expensive,” says Boud. “Other bags by other designers were selling for $20; his were $90.” Friends bought the standard LV knockoffs and asked Sprouse to paint graffiti on them.

stephen-sprouse-graffiti-tee-by-louis-vuitton

louis vuitton

Stephen Sprouse backstage with designer Marc Jacobs at the Louis Vuitton spring, 2001 fashion show in Paris where they first debuted their collaboration.Backstage with Marc Jacobs at the Louis Vuitton s/s 2001 show
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The experience with Marc Jacobs disillusioned Sprouse on fashion; instead of coming away envious of Jacobs’s lucrative LVMH deal, he realized he’d never be able to work in such a rigid corporate structure. Though Sprouse was then in his late forties, he was still very childlike and loved sitting in Washington Square Park, watching the kids skateboard.

In 2002, Sprouse designed a lower-priced line of red, white, and blue clothing and accessories for Target. Everything had usa written on it in graffiti print. While some people viewed it cynically as a cheap way of cashing in on 9/11, Sprouse, who’d lost a friend in one of the plane crashes, felt an uncharacteristic surge of patriotism. 

Stephen Sprouse for Target

Stephen Sprouse for Target

For years, friends had noticed that Sprouse, who smoked three packs of cigarettes a day, seemed frequently out of breath. At the end of 2002 Sprouse asked around for rehabs for cigarette smokers. He wanted to go to a place where they’d lock him up. Finally, Sprouse quit cold turkey, but in spring 2003, he was diagnosed with lung cancer.

Sprouse kept his diagnosis a secret from all but a few friends. Andrew Cogan, who by then had become CEO of Knoll, had hired him to do textiles, and Renzo Rosso, the founder of Diesel, wanted him to design T-shirts and jeans. He was very concerned about losing those contracts.

A friend took him to the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute in Boston and managed to get him admitted into an experimental drug trial, but when his breathing worsened, doctors wouldn’t let him continue with the protocol. Over the next eight months, he visited numerous oncologists and took various drugs, hoping to improve enough to be readmitted into the Dana-Farber program. One drug gave him such bad acne he didn’t want anyone to see him. In September 2003, though, he had to put in an appearance at the opening of the new Diesel store he’d helped to design on Union Square.

Yet he had his optimistic moments, as if cancer were just another business reversal from which he could stage a triumphant comeback. He put his energy into painting portraits of his friends and nephews. He was even working on a painting of the space station for NASA.

In January 2004, he took a six-week trip to Buenos Aires to visit a friend. A few days after his return, Sprouse couldn’t catch his breath. He called a friend, Sean Bohary, who took him to St. Luke’s–Roosevelt Hospital, where he died early the next morning.

In Paris, the fall 2004 shows were in full swing, with people saying an emotional farewell to designer Tom Ford, acting as if he’d died when he was only leaving Gucci. On Sunday night at the Vuitton show, tucked inside the program, people found a slip of paper that read, “This collection is in loving memory of our friend Stephen Sprouse.”

On March 10, 25 friends gathered in New Jersey for the cremation. With pens and Magic Markers, they covered his wooden coffin in graffiti, writing messages to him on the inside and outside surfaces of the box. Then, before closing the lid, someone placed a Magic Marker in Sprouse’s hand, so he could write the last words himself.

Stephen Sprouse

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Book

The Stephen Sprouse book

The Stephen Sprouse Book

Inventive, enigmatic, and supremely creative, Stephen Sprouse made art and clothing that captured the mood of the eighties. One of the first American designers to mix graffiti and a punk aesthetic with fashion, Sprouse manipulated conventional notions of style, and his unique sensibility has inspired designers from John Galliano to Raf Simmons to Marc Jacobs. Sprouse’s career started in the late seventies, when, after working for Halston, he migrated to a warehouse on the Bowery and started making outfits for his neighbor, Debbie Harry. The fashion world quickly embraced his innovative, culturally relevant sensibility and downtown edge. But Sprouse’s inability to compromise his artistic vision for the rigid fashion business compromised his commercial success. The Padilhas possess the largest private collection of Sprouse’s work, and were given exclusive access to his archives by his family for this project. They also obtained never-before-published images from photographers such as Steven Meisel, Bob Gruen, and Mert and Marcus. The book features a foreword by the novelist Tama Janowitz, one of Sprouse’s closest friends. The release of this book coincides with a retrospective at Deitch Projects. The book will be available with four different jackets, each featuring a different Day-Glo color, an homage to Sprouse’s iconic album cover for Debbie Harry’s Rockbird.

 

http://www.thestephensprousebook.com

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info: WikiPedia

http://nymag.com/nymetro/arts  by Patricia Morrisroe

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