Dame Vivienne Westwood inspired many Photographers

22 Mar

Vivienne Westwood. ph. Juergen TellerIn September ’14, the National Portrait Gallery unveiled the latest commissioned portrait of Dame Vivienne Westwood. She was captured in her London garden by photographer Juergen Teller.

Teller has previously worked with Dame Vivienne on a number of her fashion campaigns and was hand-picked for the project by both her and the Gallery.

Dame Vivienne said of the result: “Photography isn’t like painting, where you can decide how you want someone to look, but Juergen manages it. It must be something to do with where he places you in the picture, and the space he leaves around you.”

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Short Introduction

dame-vivienne-westwood

Vivienne Westwood, once the Queen of Punk, has been creating the most exciting and outrageous designs for over 40 years.

She has dressed everyone from the Sex Pistols to supermodels. It is almost 74 years since she was born  near the village of Tintwistle in Derbyshire and 43 years since she opened her legendary Kings Road shop. Dane Vivienne has become the tabloids’ favourite English eccentric, a dotty aunt figure who is kissed in the street by strangers.

no underwearVivienne Westwood famously collected her OBE in 1992 ,ph. Martin Keene

She is still sole owner of her company and of her name. Her stature is deserved: she is a great innovator, a unique talent who combines an appetite for culture and historical references with an unclouded modern eye and a rigorous approach to the craft of making clothes. As the art director of punk and the creator of the Pirates and Mini Crini collections, mrs. Westwood is responsible for some of fashion’s most memorable images. She is enjoying a revival of interest for vintage Vivienne Westwood pieces.

Born Vivienne Isabel Swire (8 April 1941), she married Derek Westwood at 21 and had a son, Ben. But three years later, she left her home and her career as a primary school teacher and discovered Malcolm McLaren and fashion. Her 15-year relationship with McLaren was a great creative partnership and produced a son, Joe. Now grown up, Joe Corre (the name came from McLaren’s grandmother after McLaren refused to put his name on his son’s birth certificate) is co-owner and co-designer of the Agent Provocateur lingerie label with his wife, Serena Rees. Since 1992, mrs. Westwood has been married to her third husband, Andreas Kronthaler.

westwood DBEDame Vivienne Westwood advanced from OBE to DBE in ’06

She attracts publicity without trying: in 1992 she twirled for the photographers outside Buckingham Palace after collecting her OBE (Order of the British Empire), forgetting she wasn’t wearing knickers. Mrs. Westwood later said, “I wished to show off my outfit by twirling the skirt. It did not occur to me that, as the photographers were practically on their knees, the result would be more glamorous than I expected,” and added: “I have heard that the picture amused the Queen.” 

Vivienne Westwood advanced from OBE to DBE (Dame Commander of the Most Excellent Order of the British Empire, a grade within the British order of chivalry ) in the 2006 New Year’s Honours List “for services to fashion” and has twice earned the award for British Designer of the Year.

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Portraits

vivienne westwoodPhotograph Juergen Teller

Juergen TellerPhotograph Juergen Teller

Vivienne-Westwood-i-D-Spring-2012-01aPhotograph Juergen Teller

Vivienne Westwood by Tim WalkerPhotograph Tim Walker

Inez & Vinoodh ‘94Photograph by Inez & Vinoodh, ’94

Vivienne Westwood

NPG x131986; Dame Vivienne Isabel Westwood by Bryan AdamsPhotograph Bryan Adams. 2008

Vivienne westwood

RankinPhotograph by Rankin

2003, Annie LeibovitzPhotograph Annie Leibovitz, 2003

Philip Hollis , 2007Photograph Philip Hollis , 2007

Vivienne-Westwood-by-Andy-Gotts-vogue-14nov13-b_426x639Photograph Andy Gotts

Vivienne Westwood, Andy GottsPhotograph Andy Gotts

enqpvgatlsPhotograph Gian Paolo Barbieri

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A Personal Memoir

vivienne-westwood-Book coverPhotograph Juergen Teller

Vivienne Westwood is one of the icons of our age. Fashion designer, activist, co-creator of punk, global brand and grandmother; a true living legend. Her career has successfully spanned five decades and her work has influenced millions of people across the world.

For the first and only time, Dame Vivienne Westwood has written a personal memoir, collaborating with award-winning biographer Ian Kelly, to describe the events, people and ideas that have shaped her extraordinary life. Told in all its glamour and glory, and with her unique voice, unexpected perspective and passionate honesty, this is her story.

ISBN10: 1447254120

ISBN13: 9781447254126

Jillian EdelsteinPhotograph Jillian Edelstein

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official website: http://www.viviennewestwood.com/

Info: The Guardian

A.F. Vandevorst, other Projects besides Cool Collections

15 Mar

AF Vandervorst, ph. Ronald StoopsFilpi Arikcx & An Vandervorst, ph. Ronald Stoops

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AF Vandevorst stands for the Belgian design duo of An Vandevorst (born ’68) and Filip Arickx (born ’71).

The husband-and-wife design team met in ’87 at the Royal Academy in Antwerp. On graduating, Vandevorst worked as assistant to  Dries Van Noten. Meanwhile Arickx, who worked for Dirk Bikkembergs for three years as a teenager, completed military service after leaving the Academy and then worked as a freelance designer and stylist. 

Together they established their own label in ’97, and presented their first collection in Paris for a/w ’98. The label quickly came to the attention of both the fashion press and establishment; after only their second collection they were awarded Paris Fashion Week’s Venus de la Mode award for ‘Le Futur Grand Createur’, a prestigious prize for newcomers. For the spring/summer and autumn/winter ’00 seasons the pair were invited to design the Ruffo Research collection, an opportunity periodically offered to young designers by the Italian leather house Ruffo. 

Label

AF Vandevorst clothes convey a slouchy confidence and a version of femininity that evokes a sexy yet intellectual cool. Traditional clothing (horse riding equipment, kimonos, frock coats) is often referenced, reworked and refined until it sits slightly left-of-centre; a medical-style red cross is their enduring symbol. For collection themes, they often favour the unexpected, as for a/w ’03, when honey bees provided inspiration. Following no set colour palette, AF Vandevorst stray from muted tones into brights. The label expanded to encompass footwear, accessories and lingerie and they continue to present catwalk shows during the Paris collections.

 

Exhibition & Book

In ’05, An and Filip were asked by MOMU, the renowned Antwerp Fashion Museum, to curate “Katharina Prospekt” an exhibition based upon the couple’s impressions of Russia.

Book cover

 

Exhibition “Katharina Prospekt”

A series of objects or images inextricably linked to Russia: Russian matrioshkas or Russian dolls, vodka, the fur hat, the long queues of the Soviet era, the Volga … These stereotypes give a distorted image of contemporary Russia and obscure the diversity of its peoples, cultures, styles, and historical periods. By integrating these clichés into the scenography of the exhibition, A.F. Vandevorst makes us rediscover modern Russia. Like the Russian dolls which hold inside them a series of smaller dolls, the exhibition comprises several dimensions in which the historical collection of clothing of the State Historical Museum of Moscow is confronted with ever different contexts.

n 2005, An and Filip were asked by MOMU, the renowned Antwerp Fashion Museum, to curate “Katharina Prospekt” an exhibition based upon the couple’s impressions of Russia.

katherina exhibition

n 2005, An and Filip were asked by MOMU, the renowned Antwerp Fashion Museum, to curate “Katharina Prospekt” an exhibition based upon the couple’s impressions of Russia.

n 2005, An and Filip were asked by MOMU, the renowned Antwerp Fashion Museum, to curate “Katharina Prospekt” an exhibition based upon the couple’s impressions of Russia.

“Katharina Prospekt”

Katherina exibition

 “Katharin 2005, An and Filip were asked by MOMU, the renowned Antwerp Fashion Museum, to curate “Katharina Prospekt” an exhibition based upon the couple’s impressions of Russia.na Prospekt”

Curators:Tamara Igoumnova, State Historical Museum Moscow,An Vandevorst & Filip Arickx

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Book by the exhibition

Fans of Belgian avant-garde fashion, Russian style and great book design, unite! This exceedingly seductive volume documents Katharina Prospekt: The Russians, a tour de force exhibition put together by the innovative Belgian fashion house.A.F. Vandevorst of Russian cultural artifacts borrowed from the State Historical Museum in Moscow, coupled with contemporary fashion designs by A.F. Vandevorst and others–including Yves Saint Laurent, Bless, Martin Margiela and Jean-Paul Gaultier.

There are sections on Propaganda, Military Design, Fur, Chess and even the iconic Russian dolls that fit one inside another. The bold typography riffs on Constructivist design, and we see antique objects, artifacts, textiles and costumes alongside vintage photographs and eye-popping contemporary fashion design.

 Katharina Prospekt

n 2005, An and Filip were asked by MOMU, the renowned Antwerp Fashion Museum, to curate “Katharina Prospekt” an exhibition based upon the couple’s impressions of Russia.

n 2005, An and Filip were asked by MOMU, the renowned Antwerp Fashion Museum, to curate “Katharina Prospekt” an exhibition based upon the couple’s impressions of Russia.

n 2005, An and Filip were asked by MOMU, the renowned Antwerp Fashion Museum, to curate “Katharina Prospekt” an exhibition based upon the couple’s impressions of Russia.

n 2005, An and Filip were asked by MOMU, the renowned Antwerp Fashion Museum, to curate “Katharina Prospekt” an exhibition based upon the couple’s impressions of Russia.

n 2005, An and Filip were asked by MOMU, the renowned Antwerp Fashion Museum, to curate “Katharina Prospekt” an exhibition based upon the couple’s impressions of Russia.

lb_8456

n 2005, An and Filip were asked by MOMU, the renowned Antwerp Fashion Museum, to curate “Katharina Prospekt” an exhibition based upon the couple’s impressions of Russia.

Author: A.F Vandervorst, ISBN: 978 9061 536185

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Installation 

A.F.Vandevorst installation @ Arnhem Mode Biennale 2011

In June 2011, A.F.VANDEVORST was invited to create an original installation for the Arnhem Mode Biennale, for which An & Filip drew inspiration from their second collection and presented DREAMING, a life-size sleeping girl made out of candle wax

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Short films 

String Theory 

Director Zach Gold, Producer David Dumas, Cinematography Steve Romano. An Fashion / Art short for AF Vandevorst which won the Grand Prize at the ICG Emerging Cinematography Awards. Shot with Phantom HD Gold camera and Leica Lenses.

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Delfine

Delfine by A.F. Vandevorst. Directed by Stef Viaene as part of the Selfridges Film Project.

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AF Vandervorst

Official website: https://www.afvandevorst.be/en

Panos Yiapanis, one of Fashion’s top Stylists

8 Mar

Panos Yiapanis Photography Ezra PetronioPanos Yiapanis, Ph. Ezra Petronio

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Cypriot-born stylist and fashion editor Panos Yiapanis is renowned for his fashion forward editorials and signature youth-culture-inspired aesthetic. Regularly working alongside photographers Steven Meisel, Nick Knight and Mert Alas and Marcus Piggot, Yiapanis has contributed to magazines such as Vogue Italia, Harpers Bazaar, AnOther and W and in April 2013 the stylist was appointed fashion director-at-large at Love magazine.

Crediting the launch of his career on a close friendship with iconic British photographer Corinne Day, Panos first began styling on mock shoots around London whilst studying sculpture at Chelsea School of Art. After leaving to pursue a career in fashion, Yiapanis worked closely alongside Day on editorials for i-D and Dutch, slowly raising his profile. Meetings with American photographer Steven Klein and Dutch photographers Inez van Lamsweerde and Vinoodh Matadin led to increased attention and Yiapanis soon began working on editorials for The Face and Arena Homme Plus.

Ph. Corinne Day,  the early days

Corinne Day

corinne day, Sisters of Mercy T-shirt

Corinne Day, styling Panos Yiapanis 3

Corinne Day, styling Panos Yiapanis

Corinne Day, styling Panos Yiapanis 4Panos holds the achievement of being the only stylist to appear in their own work at i-D, photographed by Corinne wearing Raf Simons a/w 2001 in front of a destroyed curtain. Photographed by Corinne Day for Dutch

Interview 

by Tilly Macalister-Smith

Yiapanis was only a few weeks old when he moved from his birth country of Cyprus to Greece. Growing up in Athens, he admits, “I wasn’t remotely interested in fashion at all. At some point I was a complete science fiction geek. I was quite insular and didn’t have many friends, so everything that I did was done alone and I kind of got lost in whatever world it was.”

It was a time of political upheaval as Greece and Turkey battled over their competing claims to Cyprus. By law, Yiapanis was required to complete military service and, so, he returned to Cyprus for a year at the age of 17. “I had a really old rusted Kalashnikov which weighed about a kilo and there was no kind of protective clothing,” he recalls. He was never called up for battle, though the experience was not totally lost on him. “You learnt a state of preparedness,” he says. “It pushes your endurance; it was quite amazing to see how your body will go further.”

After 12 months of service, Yiapanis left for the UK, moving first to Oxford for a year to study literature, followed by time at RADA (the Royal Academy of Dramatic Art) and the Chelsea College of Art. In London, he met the late Corinne Day and formed a lasting friendship with the photographer. “I was studying sculpture when I met Corinne through mutual friends and we connected, just personally at first. I knew some of her pictures, but I wasn’t remotely aware of what she was doing.”

ARENA HOMME PLUS #18 ,  Raf Simons ’02 collection “Consumed” 

Ph. Mario Sorrenti

ARENA HOMME PLUS #18  2002, ph. Mario Sorrenti

ARENA HOMME PLUS #18  2002, ph. Mario Sorrenti

ARENA HOMME PLUS #18  2002, ph. Mario Sorrenti

ARENA HOMME PLUS #18  2002, ph. Mario Sorrenti

ARENA HOMME PLUS #18  2002, ph. Mario Sorrenti

ARENA HOMME PLUS #18  2002, ph. Mario Sorrenti

At the time, Day had pulled back on her fashion work and was focusing on a personal project that she later released as a book called Diary. “She started showing me old pictures that she’d taken during the 1990s and I found them so exciting, especially at a time when most pictures were really glossy. 1999 to 2000 was that Photoshop period where everything was super immaculate and there was something really human about what she did. I would go on to her about taking fashion pictures again and she said, ‘I’ll do it if you do it.’”

Yiapanis and Day began taking fashion images of friends wearing their own clothes or finds picked up at London’s Camden Market. The pictures portrayed a grainy but beautiful youth, free of make up and retouching, and became a landmark statement of rebellion against the high shine of typical fashion images of the time.

Gradually the experimental shoots turned into commissioned stories — primarily for i-D and Dutch — and Yiapanis soon began working with a wider range of photographers, including Steven Klein, with whom he connected over a mutual interest in the 1996 documentary Paradise Lost, which portrayed the case of the “West Memphis Three.”

Steven Klein for Dutch magazine

“There was this documentary about three teenagers who were accused and sentenced for allegedly murdering three young boys in a satanic ritual. There was mounting pressure to solve the crime and they just basically set up these three Metallica fans,” he explains. “They brought in a ton of forensic experts and proved that there was no way these three guys actually did this. [They were convicted] based on the way they looked, in Little Rock, Arkansas. The argument was just: ‘Look at their clothes, they’re Satanists.’ So that was something that really inspired me and I did a shoot with Steven Klein for Dutch magazine that was based on it.”

The 2002 shoot depicted a gang of boys wearing hoodies and lumberjack shirts, draped in swags of material baring Public Enemy and Ramones logos, their faces painted with black make up like distorted masks. “Jason [Baldwin, one of the accused] emailed me from prison when the shoot came out. Those kinds of things were really important to me. It became this really big thing where Johnny Depp was supporting and Eddie Vedder of Pearl Jam released an album to raise funds to exonerate them and two years ago they were released from prison.”

Yiapanis is selective about the shoots he works on, styling only a handful of editorials each season for magazines such as Dazed & Confused, Vogue Hommes International, V and Love, where he is fashion director. This is partly because Yiapanis and his team create many of the garments they use from scratch, rather than relying solely on existing clothing. “When I first started, I’d make all the pieces myself. I’d be sitting at home until 4am putting eyelets on to shorts or something,” he says. “The pieces that we make in the studio are usually the anchoring for the shoot. Each shoot usually takes about a month to prep and sometimes there are about 30 people working in the studio. Initially, it was at my house and then that got a little bit hectic, so now I have a space about five minutes from my house.”

LOVE MAGAZINE | COMME DES GARCONS ’15

ph. Mario Sorrenti

LOVE MAGAZINE | COMME DES GARCONS '15

LOVE MAGAZINE | COMME DES GARCONS '15

LOVE MAGAZINE | COMME DES GARCONS '15

LOVE MAGAZINE | COMME DES GARCONS '15

LOVE MAGAZINE | COMME DES GARCONS '15

LOVE MAGAZINE | COMME DES GARCONS '15

Unlike many stylists, Yiapanis never makes mood boards. “I kind of despise them. It’s much more of an internal process and I sometimes find it very difficult to explain to a photographer exactly what I want to do. Usually an idea comes from a previous shoot that I did where something interesting happened and I want to take that further. I don’t overthink the result too much,” he says.

At Love magazine, Yiapanis has been given relatively free rein. “Katie [Grand, Love’s editor-in-chief] has been great to give me all the advantages and none of the chores. I think she is wise enough to know what is not my strongest suit. Why send a drivelling idiot to a Michael Kors advertising appointment? I would probably say something ridiculously stupid,” he says, playfully. “She knows what is best for the magazine, let’s put it that way.”

AnOther Magazine, S/S ’09  Tilda Swinton

ph. Craig McDean

Tilda Swinton, AnOther Magazine by Craig McDean

Tilda Swinton, AnOther Magazine by Craig McDean

Tilda Swinton, AnOther Magazine SS09 Photography Craig McDean,

While many staff stylists feel increasing pressure to please advertisers, Yiapanis has never been concerned with making commercial or accessible images. “I’m not excited by the idea of doing editorials that look like catalogues. There’s a market for those types of magazines, but I’m not excited by that,” he says.

“Everyone has got a different perspective on what this job is. Editors and designers have very different demands from stylists. There are a lot of designers that hate my work because sometimes I don’t show their garments the way that they are shown on the runway. Some designers love that and some designers don’t — to the point that they won’t work with me. That’s true of some editors as well. Some think, ‘I want to sell clothes, I want advertising,’ whereas others want a nice image. I think that’s why photographers have an affinity for me, because I try to give them something visually exciting as opposed to ticking the sales box.”

But editorial work pays much less than what is offered by big shows and advertising gigs. “I’ve sometimes sold myself when it comes to doing shows,” Yiapanis admits, “but never with photographers. I’ve always been really protective about the photographers that I work with. It’s a really precious collaboration. I haven’t worked with a lot of photographers but the ones that I’ve worked with are the ones that I have deep respect for.”

Hermes campaign f/w ’08

Ph. Paolo Roversi

Photo by Paolo Roversi for d`Hermes fw 2008

Photo by Paolo Roversi for d`Hermes

Photo by Paolo Roversi for d`Hermes fw 2008

Photo by Paolo Roversi for d`Hermes fw 2008

There is a clear distinction between styling shows and shoots, says Yiapanis. “[With shows] you are there to be invisible; it’s not you coming out at the end, even though today everyone knows who is styling what show, more so than in the past. Once I was doing a Gucci men’s show quite early on in my career. I was quite naive about it and over-enthusiastic and put too much of myself into the show and you realise that is not what you are there for. That was a big learning experience. So since then, if I’m doing Calvin [Klein], it has to be Calvin. I’m not there to be the creative director or to change the house.”

Yiapanis believes in nurturing relationships and letting things develop over time. He has worked with Rick Owens since the designer’s very first show in New York. He also worked for many years with Givenchy, where he was engaged as a creative consultant on the men’s shows for a year and a half before Riccardo Tisci began overseeing both the men’s and women’s sides of the business for S/S 2009.

Mert & Marcus and Panos Yiapanis for Givenchy SpringSummer 2011 mert alas & marcus piggott

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“I would go in from the inception of the idea and sit with Riccardo and we would say, ‘What’s the next show going to be?’ More so than I did with other designers. At Calvin, I’ll go in and they might have an idea of what they kind of want to do and it might change a little bit, but with Riccardo we’d start right from scratch. The men’s and women’s were so intertwined and because we were really close friends there was always a conversation about women’s too.”

Despite his assertions to the contrary, Yiapanis’ influence on Tisci’s Givenchy collections was undeniable; the sell out Rottweiler sweatshirts that were introduced for men’s A/W 2011 show — about the same time Yiapanis acquired his dog, Beast — were followed by equally coveted panther tops for the women’s A/W 2011 collection. “The animals changed but they started becoming one beast in a way.” Yiapanis stopped working with the house the following season.

“The one thing I have a bit of a bee in my bonnet about is ownership. It used to bother me that I have no ownership of any work that I’ve done,” he notes. “It’s either the designer’s right or the photographer’s right, so you feel like a perennial gypsy, moving from one place to another. But I’ve moaned about that in the past. When you are no longer involved in something that you’ve helped on, you just have to be a spectator from that point onwards.”

Nonetheless, Yiapanis has certainly build a reputation as one of fashion’s top stylists with an aesthetic that is very much his own. So what advice does he have for those aiming to follow in his footsteps?

Dazzed & Confused summer ’14

Ph. Willy Vanderperre

willy vanderperre.jpg summer 2014.

willy vanderperre.jpg summer 2014.jpg5

willy vanderperre.jpg summer 2014.jpg4

willy vanderperre.jpg summer 2014.jpg3

willy vanderperre.jpg summer 2014.jpg2

“Assisting sometimes can be the worst way to get into it, because if you assist someone great, then that’s good, but you have to find a way to come out of their shadow, which is extremely difficult. If you assist someone who is not that good, well, you know…” says Yiapanis.

“I can only speak for myself, but if you find something that has some resonance or something that will excite people, eventually someone will sit up and want to hear it.”

Love Magazine Fall/ Winter 2013 Monster’s Inc.

ph. Sølve Sundsbø 

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info; http://www.businessoffashion.com/2014/12/creative-class-panos-yiapanis-stylist.html

Panos-YiapanisPanos Yiapanis,  ph. Inez van Lamsweerde and Vinoodh Matadin

 

Liz Claiborne, the first Woman to found a Company that landed on the Fortune 500 list

1 Mar

After 25 years as a New York designer, Liz Claiborne co-founded her own firm in 1976, first designing stylish, moderately priced sportswear that freed working women from plain, dark suits, then expanding into menswear, accessories and perfume. Liz Claiborne Inc. broke into the Fortune 500 list of “America’s largest corporations”—becoming the first company founded by a woman to be so honored. 

Biography

Born Anne Elisabeth Jane Claiborne in Brussels, Belgium, on March 31, 1929, Liz Claiborne is best known for revolutionizing the women’s apparel industry in the United States. She served as head designer and co-founder of the company that bears her name, Liz Claiborne Inc., for more than 20 years.

The daughter of a banker,she spent many of her early years abroad, and became fluent in both French and English. Liz and her family moved to New Orleans, Louisiana, in 1939. After WW II ended, she moved to Europe, where she studied art. Liz never earned a high school degree. At the age of 19, she won a design contest held by Harper’s Bazaar magazine, and soon moved to New York City to pursue a career in the fashion industry.

Liz’s first job was as a sketcher for sportswear designer Tina Leser, also working from time to time as a size model. She worked for several other designers over the next few years, and, in 1950, married book designer Ben Schultz. The couple had one son, Alexander, before splitting. In 1957, Liz married Arthur Ortenberg.

Liz Claiborne Inc. foundersThe founders of Liz Claiborne Inc.

liz claiborne
In 1960, Liz Claiborne became head designer of Jonathan Logan’s Youth Guild label, and stayed for more than 15 years before breaking out on her own. With $50,000 of her own savings and $200,000 from friends, family members and associates, she co-founded her own firm, Liz Claiborne Inc., in 1976 with her husband, Arthur Ortenberg, and partners Leonard Boxer and Jerome Chazen. At a time when women were entering the workforce in great numbers,Liz built the company into a billion-dollar-a-year business, first designing stylish, moderately priced sportswear that freed working women from plain, dark suits, then expanding into menswear, accessories and perfume.
liz-claiborne
She also chose to revamp the visual merchandising aspect of the department store; rather than separating the store by pants, shirts, and blouses Liz chose to put all the pieces together in order to make a complete look in one section of the store. After the success of her new floor plan many companies followed suit. It did not take long for Liz Claiborne, Inc. to be considered one of the fiercest competitors in the business.
Liz Claiborne Inc. reached $5.6 million in 1986, and the firm broke into the Fortune 500 list of “America’s largest corporations”—becoming the first company founded by a woman to be so honored. In 1987,Liz  Claiborne was elected chairman of the board and CEO of the company, but she retired from active management in 1989.
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Vintage Liz Claiborne 
liz claiborne
 Liz Claiborne
liz claiborne
liz claiborne
liz claiborne
liz claiborne
liz claiborne liz claiborneAfter retiring, Liz devoted much of her time to social causes. She and her husband started the Liz Claiborne Art Ortenberg Foundation to support a number of different projects around the world; over the years, the organization has supported conservation and environment efforts, including those aimed at protecting elephants in Gabon and Mozambique.
She was honored in 2000 at the American Fashion Awards for her environmental work, especially for her work to stop the killing of elephants for their ivory tusks. But business didn’t stop after Liz stepped down. Over the years, Liz Claiborne, Inc. has acquired several companies that you may know such as, Lucky Brand jeans, Juicy Couture,Kate Spade, and Mexx
Liz faced a health crisis in her later years: She was diagnosed with peritoneal cancer, which she courageously battled for many years. She died from complications related to her cancer on June 26, 2007, at the age of 78, in New York City.
Although Liz has passed away, her name is seen everywhere and she will forever be remembered. In a biography written by her husband, Art, he concludes, “Liz left us more than her work, perhaps more than the consequences of her work; she left us herself. The making of that self, and the good she did for others, is the story I tell.”
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More vintage Liz Claiborne 
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liz claiborne
liz claiborne
liz claiborne
liz claiborne
liz claiborne
liz claiborne
liz claiborne
Lots of vintage Liz Claiborne can be found on http://www.etsy.com & http://www.ebay.com

Book

Book Cover

To have lived a joyful life and to have departed that life a victim of a vicious cancer is, in brief, the story of Liz Claiborne’s life. But the story is much more than that. Born in Brussels in 1929, the third and last child of a highborn American banker and his delicate, beautiful wife, she was born privileged and taught that privilege incurs responsibilities. She lived out her early years untouched by life and death during the ominous 1930s, until the ominous became the real and the family fled to America. Inheriting her father’s love of paintings and museums and her mother’s love of costumes and clothing, Liz early on discovered “the beauty of everyday things,” and at the age of twenty won the Grand Award in the Harper’s Junior Bazaar Design Contest, which earned her a trip to Paris to work for ten days with famed couturier Jacques Heim. For the next twenty-five years she worked as a designer and sketch artist before starting her own company with her husband Art Ortenberg. Liz Claiborne, Inc. was an immediate success, and was by 1981 a Fortune 500 company with $1.2 billion in sales. In this book Art Ortenberg does not so much celebrate Liz Claiborne the designer and entrepreneur, but rather Liz the woman. “Liz left us more than her work,” he concludes, “perhaps more than the consequences of her work; she left us herself. The making of that self, and the good she did for others, is the story I tell.”

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liz claiborne

 

info: http://www.biography.com/people/liz-claiborne-9248891

Peter Saville & Yohji Yamamoto, a Colourful Collaboration

22 Feb

Peter SavillePeter Saville

Yohji YamamotoYohji Yamamoto

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Peter Saville is a designer of unique influence on visual culture. Over 30 years he has challenged our understanding of graphic art. As a founder of Factory Records, the legendary independent label, he created a series of iconic album covers for the groups Joy Division and New Order. The graphics he devised have been ripped off on every level. Saville doesn’t mind that, though. 

He also worked extensively in fashion and arts, creating identities and imagery for clients including Yohji Yamamoto, Jil Sander, Christian Dior and the Centre Pompidou. Saville has exhibited internationally, with a major retrospective at London’s Design Museum in 2003 and subsequently in Tokyo and Manchester.

In 2009 he was nominated for the Prince Philip Designers Prize. He now plays a leading strategic role in the economic and cultural renaissance of his home city of Manchester, as a consultant creative director to Manchester City Council.

Fashion finds it difficult to get over Peter Saville. That’s because Saville isn’t just fashionable. His work is a style unto itself. He’s the original. 

Working with Nick Knight and Marc Ascoli on the ground-breaking catalogues for Yohji Yamamoto which, like his album covers, became design fetish objects. 

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Yohji Yamamoto’s ground-breaking catalogues:

Art Director Marc Ascoli, Photographer Nick Knight and Graphic Designer Peter Saville.

Art Director Marc Ascoli, Photographer Nick Knight and Graphic Designer Peter Saville.

Art Director Marc Ascoli, Photographer Nick Knight and Graphic Designer Peter Saville.

Art Director Marc Ascoli, Photographer Nick Knight and Graphic Designer Peter Saville.

Art Director Marc Ascoli, Photographer Nick Knight and Graphic Designer Peter Saville.The Red Bustle 

 

Art Director Marc Ascoli, Photographer Nick Knight and Graphic Designer Peter Saville.

Art Director Marc Ascoli, Photographer Nick Knight and Graphic Designer Peter Saville.

In a period of the 1980s dominated by glamorous, Amazon-like models, materialism and logo-mania, Yohji Yamamoto, Marc Ascoli , Peter Saville and Nick Knight advocated a new vision: intellectual, sensitive, showing almost no skin. The creative process was relatively free-flowing.

“The first step is preparation — it’s important to give yourself the time to think, to study all possibilities. Nick was always available and I feel like that’s what contributed to the success of our work…. It’s all the same today,” “But I believe what we did was unique. It was the encounter of two authors, Yohji and Nick…. And with Yohji, it’s not the end of the world if you fail, so I started without pressure and with a little bit of nonchalance, and I think it helped a lot. What was amazing at this moment was the energy of the simplicity. There was no protocols, no politics.”  Marc Ascoli.

Art Director Marc Ascoli, Photographer Nick Knight and Graphic Designer Peter Saville.

Art Director Marc Ascoli, Photographer Nick Knight and Graphic Designer Peter Saville.

Art Director Marc Ascoli, Photographer Nick Knight and Graphic Designer Peter Saville.

Art Director Marc Ascoli, Photographer Nick Knight and Graphic Designer Peter Saville.

Art Director Marc Ascoli, Photographer Nick Knight and Graphic Designer Peter Saville.

Art Director Marc Ascoli, Photographer Nick Knight and Graphic Designer Peter Saville.

Art Director Marc Ascoli, Photographer Nick Knight and Graphic Designer Peter Saville.

Even before Peter Saville began working with fashion, he was fascinated with it. “From back when I was at college, I was always more interested in the other disciplines that were going on at art school than the one I was doing,” he says. “Graphic design was a way of communicating something about the things I did find more interesting. I always found architecture, fashion, product design and furniture more interesting.”

Art Director Marc Ascoli, Photographer Nick Knight and Graphic Designer Peter Saville.

Art Director Marc Ascoli, Photographer Nick Knight and Graphic Designer Peter Saville.

Art Director Marc Ascoli, Photographer Nick Knight and Graphic Designer Peter Saville.

Art Director Marc Ascoli, Photographer Nick Knight and Graphic Designer Peter Saville.

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Interview Marc Ascoli, Nick Knight & Peter Saville on Yohji Yamamoto

http://www.anothermag.com/current/view/957/Marc_Ascoli_Nick_Knight_Peter_Saville_on-Yohji_Yamamoto

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‘Game Over’ – Yohji Yamamoto A/W 1991-92

‘The recession of the early 90s informed the nihilistic point of view that Yohji and I shared and expressed in this campaign’    Peter Saville

For the first campaign, Saville juxtaposed stock photographic images with caustic slogans like Game Over. Yamamoto’s distributors were horrified: not only were their own advertising predicting the end of their industry, it didn’t even feature the clothes. Saville softened the following season by including the clothes: but styled just as they would be in real life: by a model shooting hoops and an artist dripping paint on to a canvass.

peter saville for Yohji Yamamoto

peter saville for Yohji Yamamoto

peter saville for Yohji Yamamoto

 

 

Peter Saville’s “MEANINGLESS EXCITEMENT” for Y-3

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Peter Saville recently teamed up with Y-3, the sportswear hybrid between Adidas and the celebrated Yohji Yamamoto, for their s/s 2014 collection. Saville worked with Yamamoto for a series of spectacular prints and distorted slogans as well as for the collection’s campaign, which was titled “Meaningless excitement”. Coinciding with a Suzy Menkes article in The New York Times, titled “Sign of the times: the new speed of fashion”, Saville was inspired by contemporary internet culture, the constant look for the next big thing and the height and depths of the fashion world. He brought together seemingly unconnected references, images and words from online forums, social media and personal blogging platforms, and created an acid house paradise, standing on the thin line between the poetic and the political.

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With slogans like “This message has no content, are you sure you want to send it?”, “Change that works for you” or “Everything is not $1.00”, the collection was characterized by a strong and bold attitude that reflected Saville’s quest for “portraying the brokenness of things, the kind of saturated backdrop”. “We find inspiration in our constantly changing world”, said Yohji Yamamoto about the collection, “It never remains the same, and we never lose our endless desire to capture the new.” A playful critic on fashion’s obsession with the short lived and, at the same time, a celebration of its transformative qualities, “Meaningless excitement” was everything but pointless. Japanese tradition met all-American sportswear, the minimal cuts of Yamamoto were side by side with Saville’s English wit and the new generation of internet-obsessed kids finally found their dream wardrobe. Saville and Yamamoto did it again!

 

S/S 14′ footwear by Y-3 & Peter Saville for Adidas

FAC51-Y3 ADIDAS LTD ADDITION TRAINERAdidas/Y-3 FAC 51 Hacienda trainers (named after the club: The Haçienda)

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Spring Summer 2014 footwear by Y-3 and Peter Saville for Adidas

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Spring-Summer-2014-footwear-by-Y-3-and-Peter-Saville-for-Adidas_dezeen_ss_61

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Book

Yohji Yamamoto by Ligaya Salazar

download (1)

 Yohji Yamamoto is one of fashion’s continual innovators and this stunning book is a fascinating insight into his working approach and relationships with other creative practitioners. This comprehensive and groundbreaking volume includes an insightful interview with Yamamoto, as well as a roundtable discussion with some of his key collaborators, among them Nick Knight, Peter Saville, and Marc Ascoli. Photographer Max Vadukal, who has been working with Yamamoto for more than 25 years, is interviewed by Terry Jones, and long-time collaborator Masao Nihei contributes an essay on some of the wider influences on Yamamoto’s designs and how they are presented. 

Beautifully illustrated using amazing photographs from the likes of Nick Knight and Paolo Roversi, selected from the Yohji Yamamoto archive, this will be an invaluable resource for anyone with an interest in fashion and design

Publisher: Victoria & Albert Museum. ISBN-10: 18517762. ISBN-13: 978-1851776276

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ss 2014

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Info for this post:

Official website Peter Saville: http://www.petersaville.info/

http://www.anwarmontasir.com/saville/about-peter-saville.php

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